device

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  • noun

Synonyms for device

Synonyms for device

something, as a machine, devised for a particular function

something invented

an element or a component in a decorative composition

Synonyms for device

an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose

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something in an artistic work designed to achieve a particular effect

any ornamental pattern or design (as in embroidery)

an emblematic design (especially in heraldry)

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References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords in this release: world, Digital radiography, DR, digital image subtraction 3-D radiographic, film-screen x-ray system, computed radiography, CR, charge-coupled device cameras, amorphous silicon detectors, and amorphous selenium detectors, research, information, market, trends, technology, service, forecast.
Astronomers use charge-coupled devices (CCDs)-light-sensitive semiconductors that register almost every photon that hits them-to catch the scant rays from distant objects.
The signals produced by the camera's four charge-coupled devices (CCDs) in response to incoming starlight vary by as much as 10 percent.
Camera phones comprised over 70% of all digital cameras that shipped in 2005, and the vast majority of these devices used Complimentary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensors, with the remainder using Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs), the high-tech market research firm says.
The researchers tested four types of photonic devices -- electro-optic, acousto-optic, magneto-optic, and charge-coupled devices -- all of which use light as the primary means of information transmission.
Using sensitive charge-coupled devices to record the light and software that amplifies and recognizes the characteristic light patterns produced by the lensing, the group mapped both the amount and distribution of dark matter in A1689.
The new detectors operate like human eyes, as well as like photographic plates and charge-coupled devices (CCDs) that visible-light astronomy uses, making an image of a portion of the sky all at once.
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