character


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • all
  • noun
  • verb

Synonyms for character

Synonyms for character

the combination of emotional, intellectual, and moral qualities that distinguishes an individual

moral or ethical strength

a statement attesting to personal qualifications, character, and dependability

public estimation of someone

a person who is appealingly odd or curious

a person portrayed in fiction or drama

a conventional mark used in a writing system

Synonyms

Synonyms for character

an imaginary person represented in a work of fiction (play or film or story)

a characteristic property that defines the apparent individual nature of something

the inherent complex of attributes that determines a persons moral and ethical actions and reactions

a person of a specified kind (usually with many eccentricities)

Related Words

good repute

Related Words

a formal recommendation by a former employer to a potential future employer describing the person's qualifications and dependability

(genetics) an attribute (structural or functional) that is determined by a gene or group of genes

engrave or inscribe characters on

References in classic literature ?
The Plot, then, is the first principle, and, as it were, the soul of a tragedy: Character holds the second place.
Character is that which reveals moral purpose, showing what kind of things a man chooses or avoids.
Largely a matter of Emotion is the Personal Sympathy of the author for his characters, while Intellect has a large share in Dramatic Sympathy, whereby the author enters truly into the situations and feelings of any character, whether he personally likes him or not.
Dramatic power, in general, means the presentation of life with the vivid active reality of life and character which especially distinguishes the acted drama.
But let us assume that what is called science can harmonize all contradictions and possesses an unchanging standard of good and bad by which to try historic characters and events; let us say that Alexander could have done everything differently; let us say that with guidance from those who blame him and who profess to know the ultimate aim of the movement of humanity, he might have arranged matters according to the program his present accusers would have given him- of nationality, freedom, equality, and progress (these, I think, cover the ground).
To pass from the Characters to the Story, it will be seen that the narrative related in these pages has been constructed on a plan which differs from the plan followed in my last novel, and in some other of my works published at an earlier date.
So ingenious is conjecture that a personal resemblance has been discovered between the fictitious character and the deceased relative
Character is this moral order seen through the medium of an individual nature.
Without inquiring into the accuracy of the distinction on which the objection is founded, it will be necessary to a just estimate of its force, first, to ascertain the real character of the government in question; secondly, to inquire how far the convention were authorized to propose such a government; and thirdly, how far the duty they owed to their country could supply any defect of regular authority.
When you have studied the character, I am sure you will feel it suit you.
Neither in the Republic, nor in any other Dialogue of Plato, is a single character repeated.
Perhaps the correct way of viewing the whole subject, would be, to look at the inheritance of every character whatever as the rule, and non-inheritance as the anomaly.
We should say that the author's special ethical gift lay in a delicately intuitive sympathy, not, perhaps, with all phases of character, but certainly with the very varied class of persons represented in these volumes.
Thus a swarm of foolish novels and monstrous romances will be produced, either to the great impoverishing of booksellers, or to the great loss of time and depravation of morals in the reader; nay, often to the spreading of scandal and calumny, and to the prejudice of the characters of many worthy and honest people.
Podkoleosin" [A character in Gogol's comedy, The Wedding.