charabanc

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References in periodicals archive ?
Here we see two charabancs run by the North Ormesby-based firm of TO Harrison all set for a day's outing for the staff and families of Eastman's, the nationwide chain of butchers shop.
But Mr Nickels resolved to rescue mementoes and reminders of the golden age of the privately-operated charabancs.
We've come a long way from the primitive charabancs on which the fortunes of this company were founded.
Here we have photographs of two Daimler CB charabancs, dating from around 1912.
It made him think of the time when the lodge hired charabancs to take the whole village to the Festival of Britain.
Next on the club's 2011 programme of events is a trip on old charabancs to the Black Country Museum in June when members will be encouraged to dress in costume from 1911, the year the rambling club was formed.
IMAGES of a bygone era of charabancs - early coaches - go under the hammer next week.
Keith, who lived in Gabalfa in the 1960s, writes: "In our street, people caught charabancs from Sunday School and chapel, to Porthcawl or Barry Island, had street parties, open doors and times were timeless for us.
Many local people remember the Magnum Bonum days as a treat, when dozens of charabancs - or buses - took the elderly folk of North Ormesby on a day trip.
Some of the happiest pictures in this newspaper's archives, stretching back for well over a century, throw up wonderful old prints of whole streets, all dressed in their best and agog for the day, standing by their charabancs for a few hours out of the city.
charabancs and trams, Sunday School outings, Boys' Brigade parades and Coronation pageants.
In the peaceful town of Lens, less than a week before England plays its final first-round match there, they still act as if they are simply expecting a few charabancs of pensioners.
They came from far and wide, in charabancs, by bicycle and on foot.
In the Freeman archives is a large photograph showing a staff outing in 1926 with four charabancs outside Rhuddlan Castle in North Wales.
In the days when car ownership was the preserve of a fortunate few, for the teeming masses who flooded to Wales during the summer the charabancs were an ideal way to take in the coast and countryside.