chapter


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to chapter: Chapter 11
  • noun

Synonyms for chapter

Words related to chapter

a subdivision of a written work

any distinct period in history or in a person's life

Related Words

a local branch of some fraternity or association

an ecclesiastical assembly of the monks in a monastery or even of the canons of a church

Related Words

a series of related events forming an episode

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
These observations which Sancho makes here are the other ones on account of which the translator says he regards this chapter as apocryphal, inasmuch as they are beyond Sancho's capacity.
The words of King Lemuel" (she could cite chapter and verse as well as her husband).
I could not help thinking how very aptly that chapter your dear father read applied, in some of its particulars, to the woman you have chosen.
I wonder if the Dean and Chapter knew that he was a Radical when they elected him," another observed bitterly.
Accordingly, I finished the chapter as slowly as need be, and at the same time as impressively as I could; my auditor listened most attentively all the while, and sincerely thanked me when I had done.
This language also enabled him more intimately to follow their mental processes, and thereby to gather much data for a projected chapter in some future book which he planned to entitle Synthesis of Working-Class Psychology.
So, perhaps, it would be well to go back and read chapter vii.
From these considerations, I shall devote the first chapter of this Abstract to Variation under Domestication.
THE RESTORATION PERIOD AND DRYDEN, Above, Chapter VIII.
Why, he said, we think that you are lazy, and mean to cheat us out of a whole chapter which is a very important part of the story; and you fancy that we shall not notice your airy way of proceeding; as if it were self-evident to everybody, that in the matter of women and children `friends have all things in common.
But my readers must hope for no such romance, only a homely story, and must be content with a chapter about Vauxhall, which is so short that it scarce deserves to be called a chapter at all.
Franklin Blake; and, in sending him the fifth chapter of her humble narrative, begs to say that she feels quite unequal to enlarge as she could wish on an event so awful, under the circumstances, as Lady Verinder's death.
Pickwick, though able to sustain a very considerable amount of exertion and fatigue, was not proof against such a combination of attacks as he had undergone on the memorable night, recorded in the last chapter.
In fact, if by new, newly made is to be understood, the chapters added to this edition are not new.
Such chapters as "The Child with the Mirror", "In the Happy Isles", "The Grave-Song," "Immaculate Perception," "The Stillest Hour", "The Seven Seals", and many others, are almost utterly devoid of meaning to all those who do not know something of Nietzsche's life, his aims and his friendships.