chanoyu


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Related to chanoyu: Japanese tea ceremony
  • noun

Synonyms for chanoyu

an ancient ritual for preparing and serving and drinking tea

References in periodicals archive ?
It is said that it takes a lifetime to understand and know chanoyu, the Japanese tea ceremony, which involves a broad range of artistic elements including painting, calligraphy and flower arrangement, as well as knowledge of incense, food, etiquette and so on.
Seasonal variation accounts for some of the most important variations in chanoyu, because the tea ceremony represents the harmonization of natural elements and the refined.
Easily, with a few cultural shifts, we could be back in the 1500s hearing a description of Chanoyu (Japanese tea ceremony) as practiced by Sen no Rikyu.
Of course it is easier to explore the differences between Fluxus and Chanoyu than it is to discover the similarities through contemplation.
3) Both Chanoyu and Fluxus are informed by Zen Buddhism.
Chanoyu is nothing but this: Boil water, infuse tea and drink.
This decisive action, so crucial in communicating the true spirit of Chanoyu, can be seen as a precursor or prototype of the Fluxus event or happening.
Participation in ceremony is just as vital for Fluxus as it is for Chanoyu.
The third upstairs gallery is entirely devoted to objects pertaining to chanoyu, the traditional Japanese tea ceremony, which is fundamental to the development of the country's decorative arts and the cultivation of art connoisseurship.
In an article for the Urasenke Foundation's Chanoyu Bulletin, Koyamaen explained, "The careful blending of different plant varieties grown on different types of soil is the key to the art of producing unique, named blends of Matcha, whose quality remains consistent over time.
Morinishi recalled how her exposure to traditional dancing - when she was 10 and growing up in the Venice area - promoted her interest in other traditions, such as the Japanese tea ceremony, chanoyu, and flower arranging, ikebana.
The aesthetics of Chanoyu can be found in other Japanese art forms such as calligraphy, ikebana and ceramics.
The author also discusses the cultural development known as Mingei, the Japanese Folk Art movement; and also the cultural world of Chanoyu, the Tea Ceremony.