cathect


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  • verb

Words related to cathect

inject with libidinal energy

References in periodicals archive ?
In this sense--adequacy figured as stasis itself, and thus toxic to thought--maybe we can understand why it might be reasonable for Ward to later remind himself that "things don't cathect," which I read as a kind of precautionary ballast; he is always teetering toward this conclusion, especially in his next book, The Crisis of Infinite Worlds.
It is therefore a little too self-evident that he was driven to cathect or invest (besetzen) his cousin('s name) by a desire to efface the stain from his title: "But one sad losel soils a name for aye, / However mighty in the olden time, / Nor all that heralds rake from coffin'd clay / Nor florid prose, nor honied lies of rhyme / Can blazon evil deeds, or consecrate a crime" (Childe Harold I.
It is as if that which sparks the meat-tongue and heaves the diaphragm into such shaping of air as we call "speech" can also cathect, haunt, invest light waves, sparkled optics, and the electricity of thought into memorable coherency without any loss of one's sense of chaos (i.
In her development of this concept, she notes how Western intellectuals lack knowledge of the history of imperialism and defines this lack, what is not known, as "the epistemic violence that constituted/effaced a subject that was obliged to cathect (occupy in response to desire) the space of the Imperialists' self-consolidating other" (209).
represents, in projection, the inability to cathect an element of the pleasure-physiologic body ego sufficiently so as to endow it with turgor" (p.
Getting the basket, scoring the point, winning the game: We as spectators cathect so much to repeated performances of this particular net swoosh, yet Pfeiffer's film deflates it to a simple, breezelike movement of some woven nylon cords.