catchall


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  • noun

Words related to catchall

an enclosure or receptacle for odds and ends

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References in periodicals archive ?
She alleged aches, pains, and fatigue caused by her implants without citing any illness more specific than autoimmune disease, a catchall phrase for a variety of connective-tissue diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, lupus, Sjogren's Syndrome, fibromyalgia, and Raynaud's Disease.
Two revamp shelf space-all too often a disorganized catchall.
Tremblay said balance has become a catchall for various fields and disciplines looking at what it will take to maintain society in the face of ecological and economic disasters.
The Harvey style men's fashion suits available throughout Italsuit's online store with their many zoot suits are bound to serve as a catchall for men whose tastes veer towards the dramatic.
Using a series of fascinating, reality-based case studies, Maysonave decodes the catchall term "casual" and unveils the dramatic impact that clothing choices can make, positively or negatively, on one's career.
The NAC pointed out that there is no one exclusive blueprint for market manipulation and emphasized that the securities laws contain a catchall provision that may be applied flexibly to allow regulators to deal with unique manipulative schemes.
The book decodes the confusing catchall term "casual," providing examples and case studies to illustrate the do's and don'ts of the dress code.
The proposal, included in a catchall spending bill the Senate passed Tuesday, would insulate the program from annual budget debates.
Curry placed an email catchall server behind these domains in an attempt to aid in the war on terror.
In other parts of the West, however, the word has entered the dining vocabulary as a catchall term for make-it-yourself burritos with grilled meat.
It is a vague, catchall term that even the authorities had to admit was imprecise and outdated.
Perhaps "lightness," a concept recently introduced by John Rajchman and Rem Koolhaas, is already in its second life as a catchall term, destined to make its way through contemporary architectural discourse in the most unrigorous and stereotypical of ways?
Supreme Court, pro bono, and a catchall that included arbitrations and settlements.