cart

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Related to carts: Carta, CARS, Carters, Lowes
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Synonyms for cart

Synonyms for cart

References in classic literature ?
The hillman drew back to the cart and whispered something to the curtain.
One skinny brown finger heavy with rings lay on the edge of the cart, and the talk went this way:
said an orderly, running behind the cart and fumbling in the back of it.
Through this, another cart was brought (the one already mentioned had been employed in the construction of the scaffold), and wheeled up to the prison-gate.
Two young fellows in the cart were just getting whips ready to help Mikolka.
The order of march was this: first went the cart with the owner leading it; at each side of it marched the officers of the Brotherhood, as has been said, with their muskets; then followed Sancho Panza on his ass, leading Rocinante by the bridle; and behind all came the curate and the barber on their mighty mules, with faces covered, as aforesaid, and a grave and serious air, measuring their pace to suit the slow steps of the oxen.
Could you sell me your meat, your cart, your mare, and your good-will, without loss, for five marks?
I took care to have the cart there and then, drove it off down the road, and, leaving it in charge of my wife and servant, rushed into my house and packed a few valuables, such plate as we had, and so forth.
Instantly I stepped out into the street, picked up the box, and replaced it in the cart: in the next moment the bicycle had spun round the corner, passed the cart without let or hindrance, and soon vanished in the distance, in a cloud of dust.
cracked his whip, and drove his cart over the poor dog, so that the wheels crushed him to death.
In a moment they had passed the slow cart with the box, and disappeared behind the shoulder of the hill.
There, as he rambled along the sunlit road, he met a lusty young butcher driving a fine mare and riding in a stout new cart, all hung about with meat.
He had dreamt that he was coming from the mill with a load of his master's flour and when crossing the stream had missed the bridge and let the cart get stuck.
A cart with the seed in it was standing, not at the edge, but in the middle of the crop, and the winter corn had been torn up by the wheels and trampled by the horse.
They held their course at this rate, until they had passed Hyde Park corner, and were on their way to Kensington: when Sikes relaxed his pace, until an empty cart which was at some little distance behind, came up.