cantankerous

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Synonyms for cantankerous

Synonyms for cantankerous

Synonyms for cantankerous

having a difficult and contrary disposition

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References in periodicals archive ?
Pretty much anything that is in a version beyond three has paid its dues in the cut throat environment of creative software development, Adobe's After Effects, now in version six, is a dead-set grandmother of the post-production world, cantankerously sitting on the porch waving her cane at all the young whipper-snappers who want to usurp her place as the compositing family matriarch.
In the hope of warming up that body, MoMA is now publishing Positif: 50 Years, the first anthology in English of reviews from the cantankerously venerable French journal.
Clement Virgo and Stephen Williams are famously Jamaican, Krishna famously and cantankerously Indian.
The first unscripted encounter involved Nathalie Gibbs' rather recalcitrant set, a cantankerously paneled exercise in chic that is clearly more trouble than it's worth.
The rest of the cast includes Ed Asner, who cantankerously plays creative director Carl ``Dobbs'' Dobson, Penelope Ann Miller as preppy and condescending yet vulnerable Erica Hewitt, David Krumholtz as horny nebbish Bruno Verma, Suzy Nakamura as know-it-all assistant Beverly Andolini and Hedy Burress as McLaren's free-spirit daughter Alex.
The only worry is that it is unlikely to persuade the novice to overlook Butler's often unlovely personal behavior in order to experience the joys of his wit and cantankerously iconoclastic vision.
That movie, a Ghanaian/Nigerian collaboration, is cantankerously titled "Somewhere in Africa".
It is in this sense, too, that the impulse that continues to draw artists to Carlson diverges from the technophilia of postwar sculptural production--what in 1966 Dan Flavin cantankerously called a "scented romance in fiberglass or anodized aluminum or neon light or the very latest advance in Canal Street pyrotechnology.
Two 80-plus gentleman cantankerously share a bench in New York's Central Park - Nat (Don Pearlman), a Jew, and Midge (Charles Coffey), an African-American.