calumniate

(redirected from calumniated)
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Related to calumniated: Columnated, defaming
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Synonyms for calumniate

Synonyms for calumniate

References in periodicals archive ?
8) Valerii Shevchenko goes even farther, portraying Smerdyakov as a calumniated and heroic figure.
The pedophilic, drug-intoxicated pseudo-poet who calumniated Madison Avenue, capitalist "Amerika," and materialism in one breath and preached peace-love-brotherhood the next?
Tellingly named after the biblical temptress, the hurricane "Jezebel," which disrupts Dunne's plot to kill Julia, suggests the revenge of calumniated womanhood on the misogynistic power of murdering men.
His comedies may end with a couple about to be married, but his presentation of the married, on the comparatively rare occasions when both husband and wife are alive and appear on stage, is much more likely to show things going very badly wrong, whether the wrongness takes the form of a temptress Lady Macbeth or a calumniated Desdemona.
More generally, the authors of The Federalist Papers attempted to defuse controversy over "necessary and proper" by claiming that the clause was an "unfortunate and calumniated provision" or superfluous.
It is a sensible, representative selection with good potential for thematic exploration: for example, of calumniated wives or, indeed, of calumniated knights.
Its members have been defamed and calumniated and even their houses have been ransacked.
Hisn, "the fool whose tribe obeys him," who is usually calumniated in Islamic tradition, is represented in the traditions quoted above as possessing a sublime mind at its finest hour.
The story he tells is a version of the Calumniated Wife, one of late medieval Europe's best-loved folktales.
From the 1950s through the early 1970s, Aron was regularly calumniated by the radical Left--by his erstwhile friends Sartre and Merleau-Ponty, for starters, but also by their many epigoni and intellectual heirs.
Perhaps "follies" is a euphemism for sheer stupidity; perhaps Gloucester wants Edgar to prosper so that the good son can take up the role of revenger just offered by mistake to the bad one; perhaps he hopes that by saying these words he can avert Edgar's justified anger, or knows Edgar well enough to guess that he will be delighted to have the opportunity to play Calumniated but Magnanimous Son.