cauldron

(redirected from caldrons)
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  • noun

Synonyms for cauldron

a very large pot that is used for boiling

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References in classic literature ?
She set on every dish; and I always saw in her face, a face rising out of the caldron.
When a son takes a father into his warm heart it renews the old man's youth in a better way than by the heat of Medea's magic caldron.
And so Olson's remark helped to clear the atmosphere for the Allies at least, and then our attention was once more directed toward the river, for around us there had sprung up a perfect bedlam of screams and hisses and a seething caldron of hideous reptiles, devoid of fear and filled only with hunger and with rage.
In the meantime Davis had started a fire and filled a caldron with potatoes.
A vague sound came to our ears, like the bubbling of a gigantic caldron a long way off, and Hartman said it was machine-guns and automatic rifles.
No more bombs fell from the windows, the last pedestrians seemed to have vanished from the streets, and our immediate quietude grew more profound; though the gigantic caldron continued to bubble in the distance, dull roars of explosions came to us from all directions, and the smoke-pillars were towering more ominously in the heavens.
Within, down it sunk perpendicularly into a caldron, about a Danish mile in depth; while below lay a town, whose appearance we can, in some measure, realize to ourselves by beating the white of an egg in a glass Of water.
You will find a change of clothes hidden in the malt-house, and an old caldron full of quicklime.
The sea was white like a sheet of foam, like a caldron of boiling milk; there was not a break in the clouds, no--not the size of a man's hand--no, not for so much as ten seconds.
Every day, picnickers hover over steaming caldrons of stew and grilled meats as accordion music fills the air.
Already, the sweltering, teeming refugee camps along the frontier are fast becoming caldrons of anti-Alawite feelings.
The butcher would boil 20- pound tetes de veau in huge iron caldrons and serve his clients big, messy sandwiches filled with bits of cheek, skin, fat, gristle, tongue and brains covered in a white vinaigrette gribiche sauce.
One of the most famous scenes in Macbeth, the witches and caldrons scene, that's actually Thomas Middleton inspired from his play The Witch.
The identity of this semi-nomadic Roma group is based on the ancient craft of its menfolk: producing and repairing pots, pans and caldrons.
From the caldrons of migration and social upheaval, elements of the Southern cultural heritage confronted new Northern urban realities and morphed into expressive patterns and practices that storefront churches fostered and that hip hop eventually used for its own purpose.