bucket

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Synonyms for bucket

loads

pour down

Synonyms

kick the bucket

Synonyms for bucket

Synonyms for bucket

the quantity contained in a bucket

Synonyms

Related Words

put into a bucket

carry in a bucket

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References in classic literature ?
The guileless peasant set down his buckets and considered.
The guileless peasant instantly resumed his buckets.
Again I ordered the shrimp-catchers to lend a hand with the buckets.
But the Chinese scrambled madly into the cockpit and fell to bailing with buckets, pots, pans, and everything they could lay hands on.
There was a scuttling in the corners as the seconds cleared out through the ropes, taking with them the stools and buckets.
But as I descended the companion stairs to clear the table I heard him shriek as the first bucket of water struck him.
Bucket to the place in question," pursues the lawyer, "I shall feel obliged to you if you will do so.
Snagsby, Bucket dips down to the bottom of his mind.
Snagsby," resumes Bucket, taking him aside by the arm, tapping him familiarly on the breast, and speaking in a confidential tone.
The litter was swept up from the carpet, and the cinders and ashes were taken out of the grate, and the whole of it was in the bucket, when her attention was recalled to the children by hearing one of them cry.
This done, she swept up such fragments of the torn paper in the basket as had fallen on the floor; threw them back again into the basket, along with the gum-bottle; fetched the bucket, and emptied the basket into it; and then proceeded to the fourth and last room in the corridor, where she finished her work for that day.
To those of the white race who look to the incoming of those of foreign birth and strange tongue and habits of the prosperity of the South, were I permitted I would repeat what I say to my own race: "Cast down your bucket where you are.
Gimme the bucket -- I won't be gone only a a minute.
Forty year ago, you had only to let down the bucket till the first knot in the rope was free of the windlass, and you heard it splashing in the cold dull water.
On the evening of the 9th of November in 1878, at about nine o'clock, young Charles Ashmore left the family circle about the hearth, took a tin bucket and started toward the spring.