broil

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Synonyms for broil

to feel or look hot

a quarrel, fight, or disturbance marked by very noisy, disorderly, and often violent behavior

to quarrel noisily

Synonyms for broil

cooking by direct exposure to radiant heat (as over a fire or under a grill)

cook under a broiler

heat by a natural force

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be very hot, due to hot weather or exposure to the sun

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References in classic literature ?
Take all that you have asked,'' said he, ``Sir Knight take ten times more reduce me to ruin and to beggary, if thou wilt, nay, pierce me with thy poniard, broil me on that furnace, but spare my daughter, deliver her in safety and honour
He accompanied these words with such rough actions, that they soon got the better of Mr Blifil's peaceful temper; and a scuffle immediately ensued, which might have produced mischief, had it not been prevented by the interposition of Thwackum and the physician; for the philosophy of Square rendered him superior to all emotions, and he very calmly smoaked his pipe, as was his custom in all broils, unless when he apprehended some danger of having it broke in his mouth.
for each side, in these sort of civil broils, takes the name of honesty for its own).
I fell into some small broils, which though they could not affect me fatally, yet made me known, which was the worst thing next to being found guilty that could befall me.
It was touching, and positively worthy of tears (if Phoebe, the only spectator, except the rats and ghosts aforesaid, had not been better employed than in shedding them), to see her rake out a bed of fresh and glowing coals, and proceed to broil the mackerel.
The weather was blisteringly hot, and the man or woman who had to sit on a creeping mule, or in a crawling wagon, and broil in the beating sun, was an object to be pitied.
During these preparations his harangue was commented upon in no very measured terms; and one of the party, after denouncing him as a lying old son of a seacook who begrudged a fellow a few hours' liberty, exclaimed with an oath, 'But you don't bounce me out of my liberty, old chap, for all your yarns; for I would go ashore if every pebble on the beach was a live coal, and every stick a gridiron, and the cannibals stood ready to broil me on landing.