brilliantine

(redirected from brilliantined)
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  • noun

Words related to brilliantine

a pomade to make the hair manageable and lustrous

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References in periodicals archive ?
Women in long narrow dresses held cocktails in gloved hands and gazed into the eyes of tall men with brilliantined hair.
The seductive allure of Methwold rose largely from the clean-cut parting that ran through the middle of his brilliantined hair.
Nearby is the famous Yovogi Park, where competing zoku (tribes) from spikily festooned punks to brilliantined Elvis impersonators preen and pose to the bemusement of passers by.
Yearning for that brilliantined, cigarette-case glamour brought the Gatsby Social Club into being in the Village/West U.
close-cut brilliantined hair under black number-six headbands.
They watch the late-arriving taxis from downtown and the brilliantined men stepping dapper to the windows, policy bankers and supper club swells and Broadway hotshots, high aura'd, picking lint off their mohair sleeves.
Short, somewhat vain, with brilliantined hair and a waxed moustache, the aging bachelor Poirot enjoys his creature comforts.
That would account for David Soar's stylishly-sung Figaro - a brilliantined charmer with an oafish streak, just a few notches below the Count in caddishness.
He, on the other hand, is 'an ageing brilliantined stick insect.
He was a glamorous youth with a Ronald Coleman moustache, thickly brilliantined hair and a motorcycle; woe for Tommy.
Yep, it was strictly Come Dancing years ago, especially on Saturday night, the brilliantined boys, the glammed-up gals gliding and swaying beneath swirling spotlights, intricate footwork, squeak of patent leather on sprung, polished floor, the best mating game ever invented.
It was always on Thursday and set us up for a date in the long, lovely night ahead when, with brilliantined hair and drainpipes, we went out bopping with our latest crazes.
Tarkington-Pugh, or Doris as she was known to her spymasters at Nogswith Bookmakers ("No bet too small; you will be accommodated'') came from a well-to-do rural family but had apparently acquired a fondness for the bookmaking profession as a result of her association with a smooth-talking clerk with brilliantined hair and two-toned shoes known as Flash Sid, who 'turned' her during the heyday of spying recruitment in the 1930s.