brighten

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Synonyms for brighten

cheer up

Antonyms

enliven

Synonyms

improve

Synonyms

become brighter

Synonyms

Synonyms for brighten

to become brighter or fairer

Synonyms

to make lively or animated

Synonyms for brighten

make lighter or brighter

Related Words

Antonyms

become clear

References in periodicals archive ?
In his popular 1954 book Guide to the Planets, Patrick Moore wrote: "Io sometimes shows peculiar fluctuations in brilliancy, and I once saw it brighten up strikingly in the space of a few hours for no apparent reason.
It has been developed for anti-aging products and products to brighten the skin tone and increase skin radiance.
Summary: Solar energy brightens up the lives of the villagers in a nondescript village in Uttar Pradesh state.
You can look at the Superlambanana and it brightens everything up.
Sort it: White eye pencil along the inner rim instantly brightens eyes.
BLOOMING LOVELY: Liz Maxsted brightens up her home with a little help from son Charlie (above) while Alex Kelly (left) enjoyed making up his basket
A close encounter with either the sun or Earth brightens a comet's appearance, but "it's unusual to have a close approach to both," says Brian G.
The new room opens the rear of the house, brightens its interior, and improves patio and garden access.
In addition to The Walt Disney Company Foundation's charitable efforts, Disney Worldwide Outreach brightens the lives of children and families through key partnerships with charitable organizations, including the Make-A-Wish Foundation(R), First Book, Toys for Tots, Starlight Starbright and Boys & Girls Clubs of America, to name a few.
This system also claims to help visibly fade discoloration, increase skin firmness and prevent visible signs of aging, thanks to VITABRIGHTKX, a natural lightening complex that brightens skin without the harmful effects associated with hydroquinone, kojic acid or MAP.
What we are used to calling a supernova, a "new star" that brightens for days or weeks and then fades for months, is just a visible-light afterglow from the expanding debris.