brigade

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Synonyms for brigade

Words related to brigade

army unit smaller than a division

Related Words

form or unite into a brigade

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
To this rendezvous repair the various brigades of trappers from their widely separated hunting grounds, bringing in the products of their year's campaign.
Her departure and that of the various brigades, left the fortress of Astoria but slightly garrisoned.
About ten days previously, the brigade which had been quartered on the banks of the Wollamut, had arrived with numerous packs of beaver, the result of a few months' sojourn on that river.
General James Clinton, the brother of George Clinton, then governor of New York, and the father of De Witt Clinton, who died governor of the same State in 1827, commanded the brigade employed on this duty.
Bring us nice news of a victory by the Archduke Karl or Ferdinand (one archduke's as good as another, as you know) and even if it is only over a fire brigade of Bonaparte's, that will be another story and we'll fire off some cannon
brigade, to dhow-harrying off Zanzibar, there was no variety of naval work which did not appear in his record; while the Victoria Cross, and the Albert Medal for saving life, vouched for it that in peace as in war his courage was still of the same true temper.
So saying he visibly smugged and went off to telegraph for a brigade of cutthroats to protect Christian interests.
The next morning, when in the presence of the whole brigade Private Greene was shot to death by a squad of his comrades, Lieutenant Dudley turned his back upon the sorry performance and muttered a prayer for mercy, in which himself was included.
 "General," said the commander of the delinquent brigade, "I am
There was no lack of people close at hand, however; within a mile of where the man sat was the now silent camp of a whole Federal brigade.
After standing at arms for an hour the brigade in camp "swore a prayer or two" and went to bed.
And as we hurried up town, Joe Goose explained: "It's the Hancock Fire Brigade.
And, to save me, I can't remember whether the Hancock Fire Brigade was a republican or a democratic organisation.
They are the "fighting brigade," the "die-hards," larking about at leap-frog to keep themselves warm, and playing tricks on one another.
He rode by his General's side, and smoked his cigar in silence as they hastened after the troops of the General's brigade, which preceded them; and it was not until they were some miles on their way that he left off twirling his moustache and broke silence.