breastfeed

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Children who are breastfed for longer tend to have higher scores on intelligence tests, which translates to better academic performance and higher earnings as adults.
The recently released 'The Global Breastfeeding Scorecard,' which evaluated 194 nations with the Global Breastfeeding Collective, found just 40 percent of children younger than six months globally are breastfed exclusively.
Children who are exclusively breastfed for the first six months of life are 14 times more likely to survive than non-breastfed children.
UNICEF along with WHO recommends all infants to be exclusively breastfed for 4 months and if possible 6 months, with continued breastfeed up to two years of age or beyond with the addition of complementary foods from about 6 months of age.
According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 800,000 child lives can be saved every year if every child is breastfed within an hour of birth, given only breast milk for their first six months of life, and is continued to be breastfed for up to the age of two years.
5% of non-Hispanic White children were ever breastfed compared with 50.
Children who are not breastfed are at increased risk of infant mortality, adult obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and pre-menopausal breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
8) Eligible participants were mothers who had breastfed twins for at least three months within the last year.
Factors that are positively associated with breastfeeding at six months include a very strong desire to breastfeed, having been breastfed oneself as a baby, and being older.
Although 81% of babies are breastfed at birth by six weeks, the rates of 'any breastfeeding' have dropped to 55% and exclusive breastfeeding to 24% in England, 22% in Scotland, 17% in Wales and 13% in Northern Ireland.
Therefore, one explanation for the inconclusive findings on the effects of breastfeeding is that women who breastfeed vary in how they breastfeed, and children who are exclusively breastfed may benefit more than with non-exclusive breastfeeding.
In 2002 a systematic review on exclusive breastfeeding showed that infants who breastfed for 4 months had more morbidity and mortality than those with 6 months [4].
Qatar's National Health Strategy (NHS) aims to address this issue and increase the percentage of infants exclusively breastfed for the first six months through an enhanced prenatal care system focusing on appropriate prenatal care and guidance.