brassiere


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Related to brassiere: brasserie
  • noun

Synonyms for brassiere

an undergarment worn by women to support their breasts

References in periodicals archive ?
Empreinte has been specialising in brassieres exclusively for larger sizes since 1946.
Youalso need to show your discounted tickets at the Malmaison Hotel Brassiere to claim your pre-opera meal, which starts at 5:30pm.
That hasn't gone down well with Lee Cash, manager of Birmingham's Le Petit Blanc - Raymond Blanc's brassiere - which was recently awarded a Michelin Bib Gourmand.
London, October 12 ( ANI ): The humble brassiere, which is the saviour of female joggers everywhere and has the ability to hold men in their thrall, could play a more vital role as a company has unveiled plans for a hi-tech device that can be worn inside the bra to help detect breast cancer.
It's the same in the Brassiere, a stylish and moodily lit area where Cheeky Mal Monkeys under-12s can eat for free and our toddler was given the best of attention despite the restaurant being extremely busy as befits one of the city's top places to dine out.
Michael's of Birkdale scored two as did the Warehouse Brassiere.
WHEN, to the more curmudgeonly Briton, camp was still a cluster of tents pitched among the cowpats, the fair-haired Lancastrian was already a veteran Mother Goose, whose hairless chest was accustomed to the clasp of the brassiere, as his tight tummy awaited the tug of the corset strings.
Gary and Laura have also made an impact on the gastro pub and brassiere market placing with pubs, restaurants and country hotels in the region.
Ant and Dec having lunch in the Brassiere at OXO Tower Restaurant & Bar on London's South Bank.
1914: The brassiere was patented in the United States by heiress Mary Phelps Jacob.
The Anemone belt and matching brassiere - the belt lightly boned to enhance the waistline, the brassiere wired to give perfect division and control.
Her answer: a pouch attached to the inside of a woman's brassiere.
Among the items for sale is a model of a Belgian brassiere made by British PoWs during the First World War and a painting by Birmingham artist David Cox that once belonged to Arthur ChamberlainPicture, JEREMY PARDOE
Chargers at Ravens (-14): Other words banned from Ravens camp: postseason, apostrophe, pernicious, dysfunctional, crux, onomatopoeia, brassiere, didactic, fascist, interception, Socratic, nincompoop, amoeba, synergy, Pringles, sick leave, nifty, photosynthesis, baguette and oops.
Leading Study Shows Link Between Breast Cancer and Conventional Brassieres; New Brassiere Design Promotes Lymph Gland Drainage Removing Toxins From Breast