bowhead

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Synonyms for bowhead

References in periodicals archive ?
Data on the scarring of bowhead whales from line entanglements, ship strikes, and killer whales (Orcinus orca) were collected from legally harvested bowheads and also from aerial surveys, opportunistic sightings, and stranding events (Philo et al.
Plaintiffs did not make this showing, and therefore the danger to the bowheads would outweigh any injury to the Inupiat (33).
The last time I saw bowheads was while hunting caribou and seals with Inuits around Baffin Island's mountainous fiords.
Bowhead Whale: 130yrs One bowhead whale lived to 130 despite carrying a harpoon point in its neck for 100 years - it helped scientists work out its age.
Another finding of the study: the frozen -- and seemingly impassable -- inlets and straits separating Atlantic and Pacific populations appear to be little obstacle to the ice-savvy and morphologically adapted bowheads.
Singing bowheads were nearly drowned out by walrus knocks, the almost extraterrestrial calls of bearded seals, and myriad other pops, whistles, cracks, and whoops.
Maps 2, 3, and 4 thus indicate that the whalemen covered quite thoroughly the geographic area where bowheads were known and that the historical data can be treated as representative of the geographic distribution of the whales.
Bowheads were prime targets because they are slow and nonaggressive, and because they float once they've been killed.
The film shows for the first time a pair of bowheads mating.
Russian proposal to renew the five-year quota for a total of 280 bowheads for Inuit and far-east Russian native peoples to hunt for dietary reasons.
In some cases, several generations of storytellers described encountering the same whale, leading to speculation that bowheads might live some 60 years.
Bowheads (Balaena mysticetus) and other large baleen whales have been part of Inuit and Yupik maritime harvesting economies for over 1000 years.
In truth, scientists know very little about bowheads in Nunavut waters," said Dan Pike, a former fisheries official now working for the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board.
In general, the models assume that, since the whale has almost no natural enemies other than man, in the absence of hunting the size of a given whale population will depend on the available feed: krill in the case of baleen whales (right whales, Arctic bowheads, grays, and humpbacks, among the whales hunted in the nineteenth century), and squid and other such creatures in the case of toothed whales (sperm whales).