born-again

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Synonyms for born-again

spiritually reborn or converted

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References in periodicals archive ?
Non-white born-agains are similar to non-whites in their greater concern for health care and education.
Note: The sample for all voters was 7,328 with the following subsamples: 6,387 whites; 887 non-whites; 2,920 weekly attenders; 4,408 non-weekly attenders; 1,628 white Catholics; 222 non-white Catholics; 873 weekly attending Catholics; 988 non-weekly attending Catholics; 6,387 white Protestants; 223 non-white Protestants; 1,320 Protestants attending weekly; 1,560 Protestants not attending weekly; 1,202 white born-agains; 220 non-white born-agains; 1,058 born-agains attending weekly; and 375 born-agains not attending weekly
Those born-agains who do not attend weekly religious services have issue mention rankings and percentages that are not very dissimilar from voters overall.
Abortion was more important for all three of these groups, as was family values for Protestant weekly attenders, born-again weekly attenders and white born-agains.
White born-agains and weekly church attenders were quite distinctive with respect to family values and the abortion issue.
In 1976, Jimmy Carter, a self-described born-again Christian, was elected president with the support of many fundamentalist and evangelical voters.
By far the most striking contemporary development within the born-again Christian subculture is the rise to prominence of fundamentalist Christian psychiatric inpatient programs.
The born-again treatment providers' renditions of the psychological disorders they treat corresponded exactly to my rendition of psychological disorders Bible indoctrination fosters.
These programs, like the born-again subculture generally, put out an unending stream of invective against "humanists," "secularists," and "liberal intellectuals.
The main gimmick simply consists of administering secular mental health treatment, but attributing any beneficial result to the religious devotions of born-again Christianity.
The illusion that born-again Christians have an inner strength, a peace, and a joy--that their spiritual and psychological ills, if not their physical ones, are supernaturally healed--has been absolutely crucial in the spread of the born-again movement in recent years.