bondsman

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  • noun

Synonyms for bondsman

one who posts bond

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Synonyms for bondsman

a male slave

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someone who signs a bond as surety for someone else

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a male bound to serve without wages

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References in periodicals archive ?
In the majority of cases, however, commercial bail bondsmen add an additional level of financialization to this exchange.
They all knew his A&E reality show, in which he kicked in doors and pepper-sprayed fugitives for bail bondsmen around the country.
Bail bondsmen face substantial risks, both financially and physically, necessitating their substantial fees as insurance
At least 27 laws in 17 states have been enacted since 2010 addressing bondsmen licensure, training requirements or business practice.
Independently reconstituted by bondsmen who clung to cultural memory as a means of psychological survival, the dance was reconfigured and adjusted to the new physical and social environment.
Bounty hunters and bail bondsmen play an important but unsung role in a legal system whose court dockets are too crowded to provide swift justice.
Officers said the 22-year-old recently made a murder threat during a training class for bail bondsmen in Miami.
Officers say he made the murder threat during a training class for bail bondsmen.
That's because Childs' categories are those below-the-radar ones where musicians without stylists and bail bondsmen (sounds like a support group) reside: jazz.
Whites whose livelihoods and lifestyles were predicated on having bondsmen were left equally at sea--at least in the first few months of Reconstruction.
Three US bail bondsmen have been arrested by police in El Salvador at the airport.
As passed in the House, REAL ID would severely limit immigrants' access to drivers' licenses by imposing federal regulations; give the Secretary of Homeland Security the right to waive laws in order to build more fences along the borders; and empower bounty hunters and bail bondsmen to pursue, arrest, detain--or surrender--immigrants to the Department of Homeland Security if they are thought to be "flight risks.
Other examples of "dirty work" include bail bondsmen (Davis, 1984), nursing home attendants (Stannard, 1973, Allen, 2004), and law enforcement officers (Heinler, Kleiman, and Stenross, 1990).
To add insult to injury, no ball bondsmen would deal with him because the bail (at $400) was too small to be profitable.