bolete


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References in periodicals archive ?
The time before that, King Bolete was given the task of setting a strong pace in the Juddmonte International at York, with Postponed victorious that day The message from racecourse manager Amy Fair is to get there early.
With 2-1 favourite Sign Of A Victory disappointing, King Bolete seized the advantage and he could form part of his trainer's Royal Ascot team next month.
What to see during autumn and winter: Autumn brings an impressive selection of fungi including puffball, milkcaps and boletes to Snitterfield Bushes.
It was not until 2008 that fruit-bodies of a large bolete Phlebopus marginatus began to appear on the ground under one of the Long-leaved Box trees (Fig.
I was stunned to see the most beautiful fruitings of lilac bolete that I'd ever encountered.
My next foray into the world of wild mushrooms was with a large orange monstrosity called a bolete.
In "Giant Triple Mushrooms," a dotted stem bolete, fly agaric, and ascending brackets of chicken mushrooms are fitted together in such a way as to accentuate their morphological diversity.
Bruns 2011 Spongiforma squarepantsii, a new species of gasteroid bolete from Borneo.
Mushrooms: bearded tooth, bolete, chanterelle, coral, fairy ring (Scotch bonnet), lobster, maitake (hen of the woods), matsutake, oyster (mousseron), porcini, puffball, shaggy mane, shiitake, sulfur shelf
The young ladies sought after the shapely bolete, which the folksong calls the "King of Mushrooms.
Bolete productivity of Cistaceous scrublands in Northwestern Spain.
For the bolete mushroom, which Guenther calls "kind of a shaggy dog," the texture was modelled and then the form was painted pink with acrylic paint.
Examples include the field mushrooms, the inky caps (so-called because they turn into a black, inky-like substance when they decompose), oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus, so-called because they taste remarkably similar to cooked oysters), fairy ring mushrooms (Marasmius oreades, which always grow in circles), chanterelles, boletes (especially the giant bolete, Boletus edulis, which tastes like eggplant when cooked), puffballs, morels and chicken of the woods (Laetiporus sulphureus, which really does taste like chicken).