boat train


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  • noun

Words related to boat train

a train taking passengers to or from a port

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References in periodicals archive ?
He left with a party of Glaswegians who embarked on a boat train to Paris and then Spain.
Fortunately Harry's older brother Marcel--a talented photographer--was already in London and he received Harry when he arrived in 1938 after a horrendous journey from Austria on a boat train as part of the Kindertransport programme.
Before long, they could trace the suspects' movements from the south side to ahotel, a bar, and then on to the Belfast Boat Train at Glasgow Central Station.
The boat train from Westland Row (now Pearse) Station to Dun Laoghaire.
The line from Carmarthen to Fishguard Harbour, only has seven trains a day, and one of those, the Irish boat train, is in the middle of the night, and yet Network Rail is investing money in the reopening of this station on the outskirts of Goodwick, which it believes will be a viable proposition.
In particular I recall the very latest was to be in Cardiff to catch the 7 o'clock Fishguard Boat Train on Christmas Eve.
Her gentle humour was a mirror of her times, although some of her poems, such as Boat Train, about a mother saying goodbye to her emigrating family, or the monologue of the Northern mother arriving in the US to see her son and his Afro-American wife and grandchildren for the first time, will stand on their own in any era.
HIF YOU are going racing to Windsor, Newbury or Cheltenham - oddly also Warwick - or perhaps visiting Ireland via the boat train, look out for the Ladbrokes shop at Platform 9 of Paddington Station.
In those days, just getting to Majorca was a major trek which took around two and a half days: Boat train from London to Paris, coach to Barcelona, then steamer to Palma.
Touring will be by plane, motorcoach, boat train and elephant back.
The line was built to allow liner travellers crossing the Atlantic to disembark at Fishguard and catch the boat train, reaching London nearly a day earlier than by continuing to Liverpool.
Many readers will recognise the characterful entrance of the former Birkenhead Woodside station, as 14-year-old pupils from Prenton Secondary School, Temple Road, with masters Mr Cox, left, and Mr Kimber, right, set off in July, 1956, for a week's trip to Heidelburg via London and the Golden Arrow boat train.
They will be told how the caring businessman began a campaign of public speaking about the plight of Jews, set up a local committee and would every week meet the boat train to collect children, organising transport to different parts of the country and turning his home into a transit house.
She first came to the attention of British officialdom in December 1915 when she arrived at Folkestone on the Dieppe boat train.