board

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Synonyms for board

Synonyms for board

a raised platform on which theatrical performances are given

to go aboard (a means of transport)

Synonyms

Synonyms for board

a stout length of sawn timber

food or meals in general

Synonyms

Related Words

a vertical surface on which information can be displayed to public view

a table at which meals are served

electrical device consisting of a flat insulated surface that contains switches and dials and meters for controlling other electrical devices

a printed circuit that can be inserted into expansion slots in a computer to increase the computer's capabilities

get on board of (trains, buses, ships, aircraft, etc

live and take one's meals at or in

Synonyms

lodge and take meals (at)

Related Words

provide food and lodging (for)

References in classic literature ?
He compiled books of questions and answers on various studies for the use of young ladies in boarding-schools.
We must try and get you apprenticed at some boarding-school,' said Ralph.
After failing as a subordinate teacher in a boarding-school he became a hack-writer in Birmingham, where, at the age of twenty-five, he made a marriage with a widow, Mrs.
We made up a nice little sum for her, and she has just opened a boarding-school for girls to which the wealthy farmers hereabouts are beginning to send their daughters.
She had, at her own desire, received a regular boarding-school education, superior to what any member of the family had obtained before.
But whether so or not, I was put in youth to a very genteel boarding-school, the mistress being no less a lady than yourself, of about your own age or it may be some years younger, and a poorness of blood flowed from the table which has run through my life.
It was a good large room with big closets, and a bed which might have served for a whole boarding-school, to say nothing of a couple of oaken presses that would have held the baggage of a small army; but what struck Tom's fancy most was a strange, grim-looking, high backed chair, carved in the most fantastic manner, with a flowered damask cushion, and the round knobs at the bottom of the legs carefully tied up in red cloth, as if it had got the gout in its toes.
Pullet's remarkable memory furnished some items; and while aunt Pullet pitied poor Bessy's bad luck with her children, and expressed a half-formed project of paying for Maggie's being sent to a distant boarding-school, which would not prevent her being so brown, but might tend to subdue some other vices in her, aunt Glegg blamed Bessy for her weakness, and appealed to all witnesses who should be living when the Tulliver children had turned out ill, that she, Mrs.