blue

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Synonyms for blue

Synonyms for blue

Synonyms for blue

any organization or party whose uniforms or badges are blue

the sky as viewed during daylight

used to whiten laundry or hair or give it a bluish tinge

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the sodium salt of amobarbital that is used as a barbiturate

any of numerous small butterflies of the family Lycaenidae

turn blue

of the color intermediate between green and violet

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used to signify the Union forces in the American Civil War (who wore blue uniforms)

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characterized by profanity or cursing

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suggestive of sexual impropriety

belonging to or characteristic of the nobility or aristocracy

morally rigorous and strict

References in periodicals archive ?
8) This is crucial especially for white readers of black texts such as The Bluest Eye for, as Gayatri Spivak put it, "the holders of hegemonic discourse should .
Indeed, the significant differences in Morrison's authorial image become clear only through comparing the bi bliographic codes in The Bluest Eye and Song of Solomon before and after their "Oprah" selections.
Characters Incapable of Passing for White in The Bluest Eye and Tar Baby
Yet, recalling writers like William Faulkner, Ralph Bison, and herself in The Bluest Eye, she provides at the same time strong hints that incest is the overarching determinant of her small and isolated community's culture.
Referring to The Bluest Eye, Cornel West writes, "Morrison's exposure of the harmful extent to which these white ideals affect the black self-image is a first step toward rejecting these ideals and overcoming the nihilistic self-loathing they engender in blacks" (28).
In contrast, novels like The Bluest Eye, Beloved, and The Color Purple vibrated with the struggle for internally based self-creation.
Focusing on Morrison's intervention into the erasure of African American experience from the American literary and historical narrative, Matus calls The Bluest Eye (1970) "an imagined history of what it is to grow up black and female in the 1930s and 1940s.
Readers of Toni Morrison's first novel, The Bluest Eye, are often so overwhelmed by the narrative's emotional content--the child Pecola's incestuous rape, ensuing pregnancy, and subsequent abandonment by her community and descent into madness--that they miss the music in this lyrically "songified" narrative.
I worry that Northumberland is more likely to be spoilt by the nay-sayers, who will always see a dark cloud, even in the bluest of skies.
His memoir," Matters of Life and Data," contains his account of applying to join the CCLR, that sanctuary of the bluest blood in Little Rock.
And in the bluest of blue states, they rejected Democrats - in Maryland and Massachusetts and in Illinois," he said.
How yellow could the yellowest yellow be or the bluest blue?
The American Library Association has released the annual 'State of the Libraries' report of works most frequently "challenged" at schools and libraries, and Nobel laureate Toni Morrison's 'The Bluest Eye' has made it to the list for its language, along with violence and sexual content, the Huffington Post reported.
Rather, the Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie took the second and third spots because the books both have offensive language and depicted scenes of sexual explicitness and drugs.
The contributors of these thirteen essays examine a range of responses to Obama's presidency, including the concept of confronting continuity or change, confronting race in the Obama dilemma, the anti-Obama impulse in the 2008 election, Obama and the vision of a post-racist America, mariachi polices (the Latino vote), racism in America's bluest region (the northeast), backlash racism, the future of American racial politics, race and US foreign policy, race and diplomacy in Obama's administration, and Mormonism and the 2012 presidential election.