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  • adj

Synonyms for blowsy

characteristic of or befitting a slut or slattern

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References in periodicals archive ?
The attraction is home to one of the largest private tree collections in the country and it's in the spring the wild garden really comes into its own, thanks to the National Collection of Japanese flowering cherries - at their blowsy floral peak in March.
It boasts no great stately home, no noisy theme park or blowsy formal gardens, and even the church is more Victorian than ancient.
They are known best for big blowsy flowers and are often planted en masse, with biennial bedding such as wallflowers, forget-me-nots, sweet william and pansies, combining to give a colourful spring display.
for Recently I have been working on vintage themes, tea cups and saucers, tea pots and cake stands filled with big blowsy, heavenly scented roses with a nostalgic, feminine feel.
It's just a blowsy blossom; just a red-flecked cherry pit.
Under these blowsy peaches while I share their windfall with wasps?
He still prowls around the stage with an extraordinary sexual presence, still manages to catch the flying underwear one-handed and - in that blowsy trumpet break in Kiss - thinks he'd "better dance now".
WHITE FLOWERING SHRUBS Choose sturdy, old-fashioned bridal wreath spirea (Spiraea) and fragrant mock orange (Philadelphus) for a romantic, blowsy white garden.
Big blowsy shrubs such as hydrangeas, roses and lilacs look wonderful in a formal garden.
First, there's The Swing (after Fragonard) (2001), a blowsy reconstruction of a 1767 painting by the French master.
Yet some newcomers to wine during the build-up of Chardonnay passions around the country (in the 1980s) believed that these blowsy wines were "as good as" the French versions (when they were aged).
Big blowsy blue hydrangea heads also give you plenty of colour with only a few stems needed to create impact - easy on the eye and on the pockets too.
By 1995 we were necking down big blowsy Chardonnays and jammy, high-alcohol reds.
Her pal Celia (Elizabeth Perkins) represents the cliched blowsy, bitter housewife (should any further information about her be needed, she pratfalls in an exercise class and steps into dog excrement while trying to polish her image).
Its current revival, which I saw February 28, in the ramshackle I996 production of Michael Scott, included all that Verdi wrote (as some of the earlier productions did not), but slopped over the edges with much stage business and far too much flag-waving (and a blowsy, pitch-challenged camp-follower Preziosilla from Ildiko Komlosi).