blameworthiness


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.
  • noun

Synonyms for blameworthiness

a state of guilt

References in periodicals archive ?
An accused who acts to avoid threatened harm is morally blameworthy of the harm that she causes because she intended to bring about that harm (assuming that moral blameworthiness is limited to considerations of mens rea).
193, 213 (1991) (arguing that "a theory may be on the verge of judicial acceptance that effectively severs [the traditional] linkage between blameworthiness and criminal punishment").
that the Internet decreases the blameworthiness or risk profile of those
But Lord Faulks QC, representing the now defunct council, said BIL should carry no less than 67% of liability to pay damages to the victims, because its involvement and blameworthiness was greater than the council's.
88) Assessment of blameworthiness hinges partially on the degree to which the defendant's behavior was subject to deliberate control.
There is no blameworthiness attached to the failure to perform morally permissible actions, though other disapproving attitudes may be warranted.
suggested creating new defences to consider socio-economic disparities and racial discrimination, (11) while others have suggested changing the theoretical foundations of defences from the concept of moral involuntariness to moral blameworthiness, to allow for moral inquiry.
However, if this aid aims at deflecting blameworthiness and avoiding bilateral and collective sanctions against Israel for fear of the latter and its lobby which threatens consequences for such sanctions, then it is better to reconsider.
Twee waardevolle gevolgtrekkings van Geyer is dat plagiaat op grond van objective similarity vasgestel kan word en dat blameworthiness irrelevant is, dus dat die 'intensie' van die 'plagiator' nie ter sake is binne die juridiese perspektief nie (Geyer 2006: 151).
First, although asylum law differs from criminal law in that asylum law is widely understood as conferring a benefit while the principal concern of criminal law is punishment, it makes sense to assess the blameworthiness of child behavior using a consistent standard.
When an individual receives an unfavorable outcome and perceives others' intentions as high in blameworthiness, the individual is likely to assign blame for the event (Shaver, 1985; Gilbert, 1995).
The danger of painting with such broad strokes can be seen in the medical errors/patient safety field, where the term "error," with its intuitive connotation of blameworthiness, was co-opted to include a broad range of "actions not completed according to plan.
For example, lack of ambition is a fault of character, but is not blameworthy in itself, (b) The blameworthiness of an action does directly depend on the intentions with which the action was performed, because the agent's reasons constitute his attitude towards others, (c) We apply blame to young children differently, because of the inequality of the relationship between adults and children, in which adults are teaching the children to become good.