blackface


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  • noun

Words related to blackface

the makeup (usually burnt cork) used by a performer in order to imitate a Negro

References in periodicals archive ?
While the use of blackface obscured the identity of the mummer protesters, they were no doubt known members of the community.
Williams's signature song "Nobody" provides the primary image of the performer throughout these chapters, as the author examines both Washington's and DuBois's endorsements of the Williams and Walker shows, with their appropriation of blackface tropes, as potentially uplifting for the emerging "New Negro race.
He traces blackface performances from their inception to their influence on current popular culture, including hiphop, television shows such as Black.
Eric Lott, "Love and Theft: "Racial" Production and the Social Unconscious of Blackface," in Love and Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class (1995): 38-62.
The portion of finished Blackface lambs grading within the R class rose to 77%.
On the surface an account of the life and times of Emmett Miller, a largely unknown blackface minstrel singer, the book is in fact a treatise on the meaning and making of culture itself, laying bare the hidden origins and strange currents of popular entertainment.
Raising Cain: Blackface Performance from Jim Crow to Hip Hop.
Questioned directly, the executive admitted he'd gone to the party, attended by some of his colleagues, in blackface.
HEXHAM October 12 The North of England Branch of the Blackface Sheep Breeders Association held its Annual Ram Sale at Hexham Auction Mart with an entry of 275 Shearlings and 33 Ram Lambs.
The "Alexander" of the play's title was the same blackface character who had first appeared, with his partner "Henry" during the 1870s.
From the early days, when black entertainers could not work unless they were willing to parody their own identities by donning blackface, to not so long ago, when Asian performers had to picket in Times Square to extract a promise that the role of a Eurasian character in Miss Saigon would not be reserved for whites only, musicals have reflected and perpetuated the racial rifts and injustices of American society.
Following World War II, blackface minstrelsy slipped quietly into a restless grave.
Raising Cain, Blackface Performance: From Jim Crow to Hip Hop Cambridge, Harvard University Press, 2000, ISBN 0-674-00193-1
Instead the concept - ``Mantan: The New Millennium Minstrel Show,'' in which black entertainers paint themselves in blackface - is embraced by the network, which hires a staff of white writers for the show.
In both, Sherman tries out sociological and narrative terrain she would later skirt: She impersonates not only women but men as well (who again appear in her work only in a few of the 1988-90 takeoffs on old-master paintings, her weakest pieces to date), for example; and in five of the "Bus Riders" she appears in blackface.