binding

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Related to bindingness: conferred, reconfirm, pay heed, vitiation
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Synonyms for binding

Synonyms for binding

the capacity to attract and hold something

strip sewn over or along an edge for reinforcement or decoration

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the act of applying a bandage

one of a pair of mechanical devices that are attached to a ski and that will grip a ski boot

Synonyms

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the protective covering on the front, back, and spine of a book

executed with proper legal authority

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References in periodicals archive ?
CPNE is a stability notion for coalition and network formation with 3 or more agents, if the bindingness of agreements is not required.
I have argued that this internal dimension of bindingness is particularly important in the context of compliance with intellectual property norms, taking into account the nature of intellectual property infringement, as well as the central position that information and ideas occupy in human discourse and communication at the grassroots level of domestic society.
132) Soft law is flexible in terms of substantive provisions, party applicability, the absence ratification requisites, and ultimately bindingness or impact.
The OLS estimated coefficients on the bindingness variables in these two cases are far from statistically significant, and their magnitudes are smaller by 10-fold than the IV results.
Thus, an alternative measure of a state law's bindingness is the population-weighted mean distance from states with parental involvement laws to abortion providers in states without such laws (DIST).
The SECUDE Identrus solution, called TransFair, uses digital signatures and encryption technology to realize security features like identity, authenticity, confidentiality, and bindingness for online business processes.
the bindingness of promises in effect harnesses moral reasons in service
An analysis of the latter scenario unveils the source of the bindingness of our epistemic duty: in assenting to a clear and distinct idea we experience our will as fully unified with our intellect and as the only source of our inclination to assent; intellectual necessity and intellectual freedom are now one and the same.
Natural law theorists through the ages have taken note of the distinction between the systemic validity of a proposition of law, the property of belonging to a legal system, and the law's moral validity and bindingness as a matter of conscience.
Perhaps if we agree that the document has inherent bindingness, one can reasonably argue that the document's meaning is revealed in the first instance as a question of history.
But the special bindingness I've been referring to so far belongs only to a special class of Application Understandings.