bicycle pump


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  • noun

Words related to bicycle pump

a small pump that fills bicycle tires with air

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References in periodicals archive ?
Doctor Mahesh Prasad Rout, who conducted the procedure, informed the Gulf News that the practice of using bicycle pump in laparoscopic tubectomy was not new.
VVBALANCING the books There have been mixed reviews about Tattersalls' decision to take the bicycle pump to its Book 2 catalogue, which originally contained 1,043 yearlings compared to 833 last year.
Gravity pulled the cloud together and compressed the gas, which heats it up just as a bicycle pump heats up when you compress air into a tire.
Whether it''s simple, stuttering Norman''s strip routine involving blue Lycra and his bicycle pump or unlucky-in-love rocker Gary hopping clumsily around the stage trying to pull off his boots seductively, the audience giggle, cheer, clap, whoop and whistle.
His first bicycle pump has evolved into several varieties of bicycle-operated lift and spray pumps to suit different needs.
These young hooligans usually allow their dogs a free rein, while they stroll behind with a stick or bicycle pump in one hand ready to strike the poor animal with.
At a communal water station in a Baghdad slum, a young boy's skinny arms fly up and down as he uses a bicycle pump to coax water from the dry ground.
Cameron needs an immediate poll like he needs a bicycle pump.
AFTER CLIMBING INTO HER AIRTIGHT BARREL, AIR WAS PUMPED INTO THE BARREL WITH A BICYCLE PUMP, RAISING THE PRESSURE TO 30 PSI.
Though still happening at 60, Stallone looks vaguely like his head has been inflated with a bicycle pump.
That's because I've been inflating my bonce with a huge bicycle pump I have handy.
Cool light grew slowly upstage left, revealing a woman perched on a row of theater seats, dreamily working a bicycle pump, as more men with lit cigarettes crept onstage from both sides.
Great tits, relatives of North America's chickadees, sing several songs, including one that Dutch bird-watchers compare to the "tee-tah, tee-tah" of a bicycle pump.
There's a statue of a worker's family from the 1939 World's Fair, and they look like they've been pumped up with a bicycle pump.
Hoffmann gives the example of Andreas Slominski, whose seemingly banal objects--a bucket, a bicycle pump, a spoonful of cough syrup--gain meaning when one learns the complicated story of how they actually arrived in the museum; a performance, albeit expired, is at the heart of Slominski's work.