bequeath


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Related to bequeath: bequest
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Synonyms for bequeath

Synonyms for bequeath

to give (property) to another person after one's death

to convey (something) from one generation to the next

Synonyms for bequeath

leave or give by will after one's death

References in periodicals archive ?
Families will be able to "honour their loved one's wish to bequeath their organs" after cardiocirculatory arrest.
Actor Bernard Bragg recently announced that he plans to bequeath a portion of his estate, now valued at roughly $200,000, to the Department of Deaf Studies at California State University, Northridge.
What Taylor himself will bequeath as a legacy--and the guy seems far from through--is one of the richest and most creative collections of work in 20th century dance.
Determine a legacy for your collection whether you bequeath it to relatives, donate it, or sell it to a repository.
If we succeed, we will better serve the public interest and bequeath to our successors a profession strengthened, ennobled and invigorated rather than enervated, demoralized and diminished.
Simply state in your will (or add, if you already have an established one): "I give, devise, and bequeath to [put name of environmental group and address here] the sum of $ to be used for its general purposes" (or whatever particular program you're interested in supporting).
The Lanes are free to sell or bequeath the property under the easement, just as they can now, Mitchell said.