bequeath


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Related to bequeath: bequest
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Synonyms for bequeath

Synonyms for bequeath

to give (property) to another person after one's death

to convey (something) from one generation to the next

Synonyms for bequeath

leave or give by will after one's death

References in periodicals archive ?
The Lanes are free to sell or bequeath the property under the easement, just as they can now, Mitchell said.
BRITISH pet owners are set to bequeath a staggering pounds 26bn to their pets and many will do so without telling their family or friends, research suggests.
Gisel said she'd like to bequeath most of her dolls to many female descendants when she dies, but there's a slight problem.
Under the new system, individuals would get to create savings accounts that could be invested in the stock market, and all people, gay or otherwise, would be allowed to bequeath their accounts to anyone.
By issuing a check to a noncharitable donee with the understanding that it will not be cashed until after the donor's death, a decedent could effectively bequeath up to $10,000 per donee, avoiding the estate tax consequences normally attending such transactions.
Is this what we want to bequeath to our children, a nation caught in the grips of fantasy.
If a person is generous enough to bequeath a facility to a community, surely that should remain for the community.
Women appear in this analysis as having wider non-family and non-kin social networks than men, as constituting more than 40 percent of executors, as more inclined than men to bequeath equally to sons and daughters and to nurture ties to natal kin as a counterweight to their husbands.
501(c)(3) as the designated beneficiaries of deferred compensation items and planned to bequeath the stock options to the same charities.
Our mutual hope is to bequeath a phrase or an image to the dreamers so that we may live on in their reverie.
Yet the origin of the verb bequeath is Old English, the idea is deeprooted.
121 on a future sale of a residence, the testator should either bequeath the residence outright to the beneficiary or bequeath it to a trust that provides the beneficiary with any of the powers provided in Sec.