bent grass

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Related to bentgrass: Colonial bentgrass
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Therefore, we conclude that heterologous expression of MsHsp23 in creeping bentgrass can protect plants against heat stress, presuably bychaperone activity that allows for induction of APX.
Warnke, who is in the Arboretum's Floral and Nursery Plants Research Unit in Beltsville, Maryland, and his collaborators at Rutgers University and the University of Massachusetts completed the first linkage map for creeping bentgrass.
The location of traps was less than 20 m from the creeping bentgrass, a preferred host, on putting greens.
The test results indicated that sheep fescue, Chewings fescue, colonial bentgrass, and velvet bentgrass should be studied further for use on low-input golf course fairways in the northern US.
Almost everywhere one looks these days in central Arkansas, courses are giving up on their bentgrass greens and turning to Champion Bermudagrass.
Creeping bentgrass requires the highest level of maintenance of the cool season grasses and is used primarily on golf course putting greens, tees, bowling greens, and grass tennis courts.
Dense patches of creeping bentgrass generally are unwanted.
Currently, the stoloniferous, allotetraploid creeping bentgrass (2n = 4x = 28) is the most adapted species for use on golf course fairways and greens (Wipff and Fricker, 2001).
Plant scientists have developed Roundup Ready creeping bentgrass, which is used on putting greens throughout the United States.
The study tested pollen drift from a GE bentgrass (used on many golf courses) developed by Monsanto and Scotts to resist an herbicide.
They have patented a creeping bentgrass for golf courses that is resistant to the herbicide Roundup.
Monsanto's Roundup Ready creeping bentgrass currently is up for USDA approval for commercial planting in the Willamette Valley.
For example, there are as many seeds in 1 pound of bluegrass as there are in 9 pounds of ryegrass; and as many seeds in a pound of bentgrass as there are in 30 pounds of ryegrass.
This study was conducted to determine the effects of an organic plant growth stimulant, formulated with aqueous extracts of seaweed (Ascophyllum nodosum) and a Leonardite Humate, on the microbial populations, turf quality and rooting of Penncross Bentgrass (Agostis palustris).
One recently proposed project involved growing genetically modified bentgrass in Jefferson County near Madras.