belatedness


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for belatedness

the quality or condition of not being on time

References in periodicals archive ?
Critique: Impressively written, exceptionally well organized and presented, "Ghostly Figures: Memory and Belatedness in Postwar American Poetry" is a seminal work of outstanding scholarship and very highly recommended for inclusion in the Literary Criticism reference collections of academic libraries.
South Sudan Slips Into Vicious Chaos Amidst International Belatedness, Lack of Commitment," The Huffington Post, May 22, 2014
Thomas Elsaesser acknowledges the dual nature of the postclassical and belatedness with "Specularity and Engulfment: Francis Ford Coppola and Bram Stoker's Dracula [1992].
His response was to rethink his readership in the light of the Reviews belatedness.
12) The belatedness of the Italian colonial enterprise is but one example of a wider-reaching rhetoric of Italian backwardness vis-a-vis capitalist industrialization and all attendant loci of modernity.
Temporal dislocations such as belatedness are less a source of anxiety in Widiss's reading than a necessary means of achieving certain textual ends.
With a bevy of major national, even international poets affiliated with the South, Southern verse should no longer be viewed as an outpost for tropes of backwardness, belatedness, benightedness; indeed, the field's un-oppositional status is expressed succinctly in Natasha Trethewey's being honored simultaneously as Poet Laureate of Mississippi and of the United States.
He argues that the only way to do justice to the age is to recognize its position outside of time in part because of our own profound belatedness.
20) This destabilization of temporal order alerts us to the haunting presence of the past but also opens up the possibility of an alternative temporality, a queer time that, in its turn away from chrononormativity, embraces 'asynchrony, anachronism, anastrophe, belatedness, compression [and] delay'.
Keats had only in 1818 moved from the Petrarchan form favored by Wordsworth to Shakespearean form, a move that, as Jennifer Ann Wagner has argued, marks both an anxiety of influence and an elegiac engagement with the problem of closure which in Keats's work is closely linked to consciousness of literary belatedness and fears of the transitory and insubstantial nature of his own achievement.
Part of what makes Fase so affecting is that it somehow communicates the poignant quality of its own belatedness.
Everything is Illuminated doubles these forces of belatedness and becoming more than once, creating in this way an ever-shifting field of forces, as if cutting through an ocean.
If anything, the belatedness and irretrievability of the past make the realization, as he says, "hopelessly poignant.
The three-part organization of the novel stages a dialectic of rivalry between the protagonists, Strange and Norrell, wherein their anxiety of magical influence and their anguished sense of belatedness is ultimately transcended in their acquiescence to the ancient magician, the Raven King, who dominates the last third of the novel.
This identification is, moreover, almost involuntary; Coover skilfully exploits our shared sense of belatedness, our sense of always-already inhabiting pre-existing genres, rituals and over-familiar narratives, having absorbed, as Noir has it, "Some kind of catechism, learned before learning" (171).