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Related to behaviorist: Animal behaviorist
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  • noun
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Synonyms for behaviorist

a psychologist who subscribes to behaviorism


Related Words

of or relating to behaviorism

References in periodicals archive ?
Typical costs for a qualified trainer or behaviorist run between $500 and $1200 depending on the situation.
Don't miss this incredible opportunity to hear America's most sought-after cat behaviorist speak about the animals we love - cats
At the 2009 convention, I chaired a symposium in which I outlined likely reasons why behaviorists more frequently deal with individuals with DD/AUT than with other types of disorders or problems.
Like the behaviorists, Dewey saw the classroom environment (created by the teacher) as ultimately determinative of whether students learn.
Enter renowned dog behaviorist Cesar Millan of the National Geographic Channel's new daily series The Dog Whisperer.
In a release, the ARS described a finding by insect behaviorist Michael T.
John Kirtland, Ringling's executive director of animal stewardship and an animal behaviorist by training, says the CEC's and IEF's efforts are still a "work in progress," although the commitment is there.
Although I am a strict behaviorist in the Skinnerian tradition, I
Steve Diller, animal behaviorist, of the Center for Animal Behavior and Canine Instruction in Elmsford, NY, says "no one answer works for all dogs.
Prior to 1989, the school principal and a handful of teachers recognized the problematic nature of direct, behaviorist theory based instruction for mathematics.
Former SEGA designer Malt Wolf consulted with a cat behaviorist to create the ultimate cat arcade.
Locating behaviourism's roots in the pragmatism of the Progressivist movement, the objectivism of the newly emerging and institutionalized social sciences, and the philosophical functionalism of the New Realists, Mills writes that "American psychologists welcomed them [various behaviorist positions] not because they were novel or because they were familiar" (p.
Gerald Patterson and Karen Yoerger then explore the causes of later onset delinquency and demonstrate the close tie between the age of onset distinction and the elegant application of behaviorist psychology to delinquency.
Such knowledge may have been helpful to Murray in formulating his insights; but his analysis of characters' motivations - why they say what they do, what their language may or may not disclose, what determines their engagement with or detachment from their roles - owes as much to old-fashioned close reading as to behaviorist theory.
Regularization was particularly visible in the 1920s and 1930s, when the behaviorist approach of psychologist John Watson heavily influenced popular advice.