bard

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Synonyms for bard

Synonyms for bard

Synonyms for bard

a lyric poet

Related Words

an ornamental caparison for a horse

References in periodicals archive ?
William Evans, Bardic name Wil Ifan, won with his poem Pwyll Pendefig Dyfed.
In 1873, as the 'archdruid of Gwynedd', the Rev James offered the prize for the best 'peithynfaen', wooden books with verse written in bardic characters known as 'Coelbren y Beirdd'.
Thus, Schuchard shows, the beginning of Yeats's interest in the bardic arts took shape as part of a tradition, and not just an ancient tradition that needed to be revived, but a more recent movement familiar to Yeats's immediate precursors and contemporaries.
Also experiencing the Bardic bug were staff and pupils at Alcester Grammar School, in Birmingham Road, Alcester.
Arthur Roberts, of pressure group People for Proper Policing, said: "As a Welshman I fail to see why there should be a police involvement with a wooden bardic chair, even if the chief is a bard of the Eisteddfod.
As Haycock points out, citing these lines, '[Taliesin] is a repository of bardic skill: "llogell kerd" ("chest of song").
He chose the bardic name of ap Aneurin, a tribute both to a 6th-century Welsh poet and to Aneurin Bevan, the Labour Party politician who founded the National Health Service.
More often lately, the actor-director has had his Bardic sights on the bigscreen.
A POLICY to control tobacco smoking should be introduced in Ireland, according to the president of the Irish Bardic Federation.
Bardic Nationalism: The Romantic Novel and the British Empire.
Armed with an Academy Award for her four-role bravura turn in ``Shakespeare in Love,'' Gwyneth Paltrow is looking to replicate her Bardic success on the stage.
Bardic Nationalism is an ambitious intervention in the rewriting of the history of the novel.
This was not pure charlatanry, as my friend was quick to point out, but demonstrated that the public requires, even today, that a fabulist should appear a true bardic descendant of Homer or Aesop, an original, spontaneous conduit of a popular, unlettered art uncontaminated by high culture or scholarship.
The British bardic annals, rich with stories of important events, were unknown to the Romans, who, when they bothered to record anything about Britain, did so only to advance their own glory: "though the Romans here / So noble Trophies left, as verie worthie were / A people great as they, yet did they ours neglect, / Long rear'd ere they arr',v'd" (327-30).
The "kind" was bardic, didactic, personal, where the artist's presence is as crucial as his work.