baptistry


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  • noun

Synonyms for baptistry

bowl for baptismal water

References in periodicals archive ?
The low sun creates a moody setting inside The Baptistry - one of the many hidden gems and side chapels inside the Liverpool Purchase: www.
The baptistry arrangement was a repeat of the bride's floral selections.
One such commission was the Baptistry of the Church of the Irish Martyrs in Naas, County Kildare.
There doesn't seem to be anything sinister about Karl's participation in this religious ritual; in fact, the outdoor setting for the baptism offers even an idyllic contrast to the plain everydayness of Mac Sledge's dunking in the worn-out concrete block baptistry of Tender Mercies.
Famous in his own time, and knighted by the Aldobrandini Pope Clement VIII as Cavaliere d'Arpino for his decorative work in St Peter's and the Lateran Baptistry, his brightness has been dimmed by the fame of the contemporaneous Bolognese School and that of Caravaggio, who was for a while his assistant, and to the end esteemed Cesari, taking hints from Cesari's Betrayal of Christ for his own version now in the Dublin National Gallery.
Then he was baptized and others with him, and he disposed of the baptistry and destroyed the altar.
The leaning tower, the cathedral and the baptistry are architecturally fabulous and sit wonderfully together as if built with the intention of being placed inside a souvenir snow globe.
As early as 1904 the pioneering art historian Cornelius von Fabriczy, in a wide-ranging and still valid article about Michelozzo, the one-time partner of Donatello, noted the sculpture's similarity to a silver statuette on the altarpiece from the Baptistry and a life-size statue in terracotta in the Annunziata and felt that it might be attributable to Michelozzo's late period.
Bas-relief, a French word meaning "free on three sides," is exemplified by the bronze doors masterfully created by Ghiberti for the Baptistry in Florence, Italy, which show a remarkable sensation of depth through the use of the formal laws of perspective.
One might argue further that such was the case in particular for the two earlier buildings with concave ceilings across the street from the Cathedral of Florence, shaped differently but formally and iconographically akin to it and to each other: the imposing octagonal Baptistry and the smaller, round-arched loggia covered by a canopy-like, hemispherical groin vault that adjoins the former oratory and residence of the Company of Santa Maria della Misericordia.
D'Accone, "The Musical Chapels at the Florentine Cathedral and Baptistry during the First Half of the 16th Century"; "Updating the Style: Francesco Corteccia's Revisions in His Responsories for Holy Week; "Matteo Rampollini and His Petrarchan Canzoni Cycles"; "Singolarita di alcuni aspetti della musica sacra fiorentina del Cinquecento"; "The Florentine fra Mauros: A Dynasty of Musical Friars"; "Marco da Gagliano and the Florentine Tradition for Holy Week Music"; and "Repertory and Performance Practice in Santa Maria Novella at the Turn of the 17th Century.
Construction was finished earlier this year on a church complete with fire sprinklers, a burglar alarm, oak pews, velvet benches, pianos in every room and a baptistry viewable via double doors into the cultural room.
The author then guides a pilgrim in a walk around the typical parts of the traditional Catholic church, explaining the role (and consequently the structure and place) of the altar, the altar rail, the baldachin, the baptistry, the confessional, the facade, the gallery, the lectern, the narthex, the nave, the portal, the pulpit, the reredos, the rose window, the sanctuary, the tabernacle, etc.
David Soos of Maumelle has created stained glass windows for the lobby and baptistry, said architect John McMorran of Lewis Elliott & Studer of Little Rock.
The bulk of the music--a motet and a madrigal for the program of July 6, and all of the music for the play on July 9--was written by Francesco Corteccia, the leading Florentine musician of the day and a loyal Medicean who for years headed the chapels of the Duomo and Baptistry.