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  • noun

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a popular trend that attracts growing support

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a large ornate wagon for carrying a musical band

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References in periodicals archive ?
CRITICAL THINKING: Link the bandwagon effect to the New Hampshire primary.
Does history suggest that victory in New Hampshire does produce a bandwagon effect?
In the presence of strong bandwagon pressures, innovation adoptions by firms would not produce higher firm value since there are no real economic benefits to the adopting firms.
In this article, we examine bandwagon pressure from a different perspective.
The study cannot discern the effect of bandwagon pressure from the overall impact of the operations innovation adoption by top management.
In future research on the measurement of bandwagon pressure, researchers could address the measurement issue by observing the decision-making process of a few chosen executives.
They didn't notice a slower-running bandwagon chugging along in the distance and driven by Wilko.
Mr Prescott said: "Fourteen pints Billy Hague - drunk in charge of a bandwagon.
A complete bandwagon, including the restored Model A truck it is mounted on, is $28,000.
Dobson's brief is to highlight how Hague has jumped from one bandwagon to another and to expose his character flaws.
This fundamental flaw, the lack of a coherent political approach, leads him to jump from one bandwagon to another.
Apart from those works, there are other researchers who have been unable to corroborate a bandwagon effect in their inquiry.
The bandwagon effect is not the only illustration of public opinion polls influencing the electoral process, but it is a common enough example that it seems appropriate to explore the relationship of Canadian federal election results with a portrait of the public mood at the beginning of each of those campaigns.
Caution is certainly advisable in drawing any conclusions from such a table, however if there was consistent evidence of a net bandwagon effect at the national level, one would expect to see a different pattern to the results.
Even if there is little indication of nationwide bandwagon voting over time, is it not possible that such a phenomenon could be occurring at sub-national or regional levels?