band

(redirected from bands)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to bands: Boy bands
  • all
  • noun
  • verb
  • phrase

Synonyms for band

Synonyms for band

a long narrow piece, as of material

a closed plane curve everywhere equidistant from a fixed point or something shaped like this

to encircle with or as if with a band

a number of individuals making up or considered a unit

a group of people acting together in a shared activity

an organized group of criminals, hoodlums, or wrongdoers

to assemble or join in a group

Synonyms for band

a stripe or stripes of contrasting color

an adornment consisting of a strip of a contrasting color or material

a range of frequencies between two limits

a cord-like tissue connecting two larger parts of an anatomical structure

Synonyms

Related Words

jewelry consisting of a circlet of precious metal (often set with jewels) worn on the finger

a driving belt in machinery

Related Words

a thin flat strip or loop of flexible material that goes around or over something else, typically to hold it together or as a decoration

Related Words

a strip of material attached to the leg of a bird to identify it (as in studies of bird migration)

Synonyms

Related Words

a restraint put around something to hold it together

bind or tie together, as with a band

Related Words

attach a ring to the foot of, in order to identify

Synonyms

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
Comrades all, ye know that our band has sadly lacked a leader--one of birth, breeding, and skill.
And seeing the men stood in doubt at this, he continued: "But I'll gladly join your band, and you take me, as a common archer.
Beside the regular operations of these formidable rivals, there have been from time to time desultory enterprises, or rather experiments, of minor associations, or of adventurous individuals beside roving bands of independent trappers, who either hunt for themselves, or engage for a single season, in the service of one or other of the main companies.
The consequence is that the Rocky Mountains and the ulterior regions, from the Russian possessions in the north down to the Spanish settlements of California, have been traversed and ransacked in every direction by bands of hunters and Indian traders; so that there is scarcely a mountain pass, or defile, that is not known and threaded in their restless migrations, nor a nameless stream that is not haunted by the lonely trapper.
It was a band of Sioux warriors, upwards of six hundred strong.
Hunt would do him some ill office with the Sioux band, securing his own passage through their country by pretending that he, with whom they were accustomed to trade, was on his way to them with a plentiful supply of goods.
We will now present the Royal Band of Whiskered Friskers.
Now the band played a march and a company of rabbit soldiers came in.
Sometimes the band took measured steps in unison to one side or the other, or backward and again forward--it all seemed very silly and meaningless to me, but at the end of the first piece the Mahars upon the rocks showed the first indications of enthusiasm that I had seen displayed by the dominant race of Pellucidar.
When the band had exhausted its repertory it took wing and settled upon the rocks above and behind the queen.
Instead of any longer throwing away the precious moments, in fruitless endeavours to induce his foe to cross the stream, the young partisan of the Pawnees led his troops, at a swift gallop, along its margin, in quest of some favourable spot, where by a sudden push he might throw his own band without loss to the opposite shore.
He sat the beast as if conscious that the eyes of two tribes were on his movements; and as nothing could be more acceptable and grateful to his own band, than this display of native grace and courage, so nothing could be more taunting and humiliating to their enemies.
The strange creatures set the travelers down carefully before the gate of the City, the King bowed low to Dorothy, and then flew swiftly away, followed by all his band.
Then he chose the stoutest bow among them all, next to Robin's own, and a straight gray goose shaft, well-feathered and smooth, and stepping to the mark--while all the band, sitting or lying upon the greensward, watched to see him shoot--he drew the arrow to his cheek and loosed the shaft right deftly, sending it so straight down the path that it clove the mark in the very center.
Dorothy looked to see what they were cheering at, and discovered that behind the band was the famous Scarecrow, riding proudly upon the back of a wooden Saw-Horse which pranced along the street almost as gracefully as if it had been made of flesh.