bailor

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  • noun

Words related to bailor

the person who delivers personal property (goods or money) in trust to the bailee in a bailment

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46) Under PPSA section 14 PMSIs include the interest of a vendor under a retention of title arrangement and those of a lessor or bailor under a PPS lease and of a consignor under a commercial consignment.
Other examples of bailment include hotel guests who give their car and keys to a valet (the guest is the bailor and the hotel is the bailee); a hotel that rents projection equipment from a rental company for use by conference attendees (the rental company is the bailor and the hotel is the bailee); and a diner at a restaurant who leaves her coat with a coatroom attendant (the diner is the bailor and the restaurant is the bailee).
Part of every bailment is an agreement, express or implied, by the bailee to return the bailed goods to the bailor.
If a bailment exists, the bailee is expected to return the goods at the end of the bailment period or otherwise comply with directions from the bailor.
The relationship of bailor and bailee never came into existence because plaintiff did not entrust his coat to defendant.
This argument foundered however on the court's finding that the bailment claims fell outside the scope of the Treaty, which the family dodged by the simple device of suing as bailors rather than as victims of the original expropriation: ".
Gratuitous promises superadded to gratuitous bailments, for example, are enforceable irrespective of the want of consideration, and essential promises made by sub-bailees to sub-bailors can be enforced against those sub-bailees by contractually unrelated head bailors.
As we have already observed, sub-bailees can be liable on promissory commitments to head bailors irrespective of the absence of any interlinking contract.
A bailor need have no active role in the creation of the bailment.
Gratuitous bailments are for the sole benefit of either the bailor or the bailee.
Bailors of cultural chattels can also learn from this case.
Future bailors of valuable objects would do well to consider how, if the necessity arose, they would be able to prove the value of those objects, whether by reference to some onward sale or otherwise, following a loss by the bailee.
A bailee who reasonably suspects that the bailed goods are criminal property might also reasonably expect that the terms of the bailment will entitle him to check the legal status of the goods before transferring them (to the bailor or anyone else) or agreeing to remain in possession.
When a bailed chattel has become lost, stolen, destroyed or damaged while in the bailee's possession, and the bailor sues for damages, the bailee must show on the balance of probabilities that the adverse event did not result from any failure on the bailee's part to exercise reasonable care and skill in the custody and management of the chattel.
concluded that, since on the balance of probabilities the thieves had been supplied with material inside information or assistance enabling them to gain entry, the warehouse company was vicariously liable to the bailor for the resultant loss.