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At the spots with 5000 times more background radiation, a person would receive this annual dose of one millisievert in just two hours, Raina said.
The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation was discovered by accident in 1965 by two Bell Laboratory scientists, Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, as they tracked down sources of radio interference.
In 1980, Cohen reported total cancer mortality rates were inversely related to background radiation for the United States population, which was then around 200 million (Figure 2c).
In recent years, there have been some hypotheses suggesting that the spectrum and statistics of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation has a kind of scale invariant character [1], which may be related to non-integer Hausdorff dimension.
This is a delayed coincidence experiment, so only accidental coincidences from background radiation will appear as background events in the data.
Theorists in the 1960s said seeds of galaxies could be seen as ripples in the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation from the Big Bang.
This afterglow is called cosmic microwave background radiation.
Furthermore, regions with high background radiation from radioactive fallout, or heavy downwind radiological discharges from nuclear weapon facilities, accompanied with relatively high indoor radon concentrations show evidence of high MS prevalence.
The White Hole model also accounts for the cosmic background radiation and the flat nature of the universe, because it expands forever.
It's the only object found so far that has a temperature lower than the background radiation.
It is the only object that has a temperature lower than the background radiation.
I think you should ask yourself if Amersham has contributed towards the background radiation levels in this area.
One complete body scan by the Secure 1000 is equal to approximately 6 microREMs of radiation, equivalent to what a person would receive from watching television for a few minutes, and is less than 1% of the minimum natural level of background radiation that all people are exposed to every day.
Natural background radiation is a part of our everyday lives," retorts Steve Kerekes, a spokesperson for the Nuclear Energy Institute.