babushka

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  • noun

Words related to babushka

a woman's headscarf folded into a triangle and tied under the chin

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References in periodicals archive ?
The Documentary Jury awarded a special mention for directing: The Babushkas of Chernobyl, directed by Holly Morris, Anne Bogart Producers: Holly Morris, Anne Bogart Featuring: Valentyna Sochenok, Hanna Zavorotnya, Maria Shovkuta Film Description: In the radioactive "dead zone" surrounding Chernobyl's Reactor No.
It's not quite derelict but one can imagine the pallor of these worshippers as being the same as the church's yellowed exterior--a congregation of Babushkas.
Grandmother kept her counsel--but 40 years later, it seems that she and the other babushkas have won out.
They aimed first to convince an uninformed public that there are indeed Jews in the South, and second to contest the stereotype of Jewish immigrants as men in black hats and women in babushkas who traveled in steerage and arrived at Ellis Island around 1900.
I even got permission from some little old ladies, babushkas and all, to have my picture taken with them.
Mantillas, stocking caps, berets, babushkas, yarmulkes.
Babushkas in headscarfs genuflected and Cossacks in uniform strutted, as the limousines swept into a monastery that was returned to the church in the millennium year, only five years ago.
Celebrities mixed with ex-convicts, as black-market spekulanti (tradesmen) charmed neighboring babushkas to dance.
Yet, judging by advance publicity, viewers shouldn't expect too much in the way of wizened babushkas and fairy tale grandfathers.
Years ago fun was made of the old Babushkas in the Soviet Union sweeping the street with their brooms, but that waws their contribution to their eventual welfare.
There is more than just a touch of Byzantine Old Mother Russia about St Petersburg - but don't expect to find dancing Cossacks, babushkas or balalaika - strumming buskers because this is a modern Europeanstyle city.
There were stylish couples, delightful and polite teenagers out on a date together, and real Russian babushkas in their shawls and crumpled woollen stockings; no elitism here, or sneers that opera is just for toffs.
Babushkas (old ladies) in headscarves, sold a variety of foods the length of the train, tasty alternatives to the dining car.
At the heart of the array were three social-realist black-marble statues of women in babushkas.
We've had babushkas (grannies) queueing for tickets alongside schoolgirls.