atrociousness


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Related to atrociousness: perpetually, effortlessly
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Synonyms for atrociousness

Synonyms for atrociousness

the quality of being shockingly cruel and inhumane

References in periodicals archive ?
Admittedly, it may be difficult to find a comparatively sufficient ordinary crime that reflects the seriousness and atrociousness of the international War Crime of "[d]estroying or seizing the property of an adversary.
The atrociousness of the Ba'ath regime, and its internal and external record of violence, are completely irrelevant to this judgement.
In the end then, Radovan Karadzic, a war criminal of virtually unsurpassed atrociousness who continues to destabilize a volatile region, is allowed to roam free--not because we can't get him but because we have chosen not to.
The nature of the harm, the degree of control exercised by the abuser, and persistent state inaction confirm that simply because "domestic violence is privately, as opposed to officially, inflicted does not diminish its atrociousness nor the need for international sanction.
The atrociousness of the dictatorship in the Philippines, which was administered directly, is captured in General Jake Smith's words to the Marines: "I wish you to kill and burn.
The numbers killed at Hama are far higher, although this does not decrease the atrociousness of the 1860 carnage.
In other words, if the ICC is successful, it will function not only to prevent atrocities in identified conflict situations, but also to sharpen the popular understanding of the atrociousness of sexual and gender violence and persecution and the relation between torture in intimate relationships and atrocities in the context of war.
By falsifying what had happened at Maspero, Pope Tawadros undermines Christian activists and antagonises the revolutionaries, particularly those who participated in the march or had witnessed its atrociousness.
They have engaged in numerous acts of violence, rivaling those of the Army in scale and atrociousness and may have been responsible for the assassination of a widely-respected, moderate Catholic Archbishop, who was a Tutsi.