aspirin

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Researchers at Newcastle University, working with academics around the world, have shown that taking aspirin for a number of years more than halves a person's chance of getting hereditary cancer.
It is the first time a trial such as this has been undertaken and the findings suggest aspirin treatment could prevent up to 10,000 cancers over the next 30 years and possibly save 1,000 lives.
What we have finally shown is that aspirin has a major preventative effect on cancer but this doesn't become apparent until years later.
Breast cancer survivors who take aspirin regularly may be less likely to die or have their cancer return, US researchers reported.
Chewing aspirin or even letting the tablets dissolve in the mouth can seriously damage teeth, a report of two such cases suggests.
Dentists have long discouraged patients from chewing aspirin since it can irritate the gums and cause mouth ulcers--what some dentists call "aspirin burn.
The active ingredient - acetylsalicylic acid - is identical in each one, so cheaper, non-branded aspirins should be fine.
Some aspirins have a safety coating which allows it to pass through the stomach to the small intestine before dissolving.