ascription

(redirected from ascriptions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.
  • noun

Synonyms for ascription

the act of attributing

Synonyms for ascription

assigning some quality or character to a person or thing

References in periodicals archive ?
The stigmatized racial ascriptions we suffer under today are constructed in substantial part out of implicit and explicit stereotypes and implicit affective biases, which are in turn facilitated by physical isolation and by social disadvantage visibly associated with racial divisions.
Without these ascriptions, the interplay in the lounge that stages a confrontation would not have been possible.
Implicitly, it is methodological caution which is the root cause of Herodotus' ascription of multiple possible motivations to his historical actors.
Those who champion collective responsibility sometimes concede (French, Held) that in many types of situations the individualist principles suffice to make appropriate ascriptions of moral responsibility.
Not labeled as appendices, but functioning as such, we find a listing of all the composers identified in the ascriptions reported in the catalog with basic biographical and bibliographic information, and a similar list of the known poets for the texts, indicating for each which of their poems were set to music along with the composers and sources for the songs.
1605-27) involvement in realistic portraiture; (3) the organization of the court ateliers; (4) the problem of signatures, where the author makes the important distinction between signatures of painters in their own hand and contemporary ascriptions by another party, such as supervisors or patrons; and the problem of variously spelled names; (5) collaboration between artists; (6) the social and cultural background of painters; (7) self portraits of artists; (8) the way paintings were executed; (9) contemporary views on Mughal art; (10) chronology of major illustrated manuscripts; and (11) major collections of miniatures.
Individuals' ascriptions for the consequences of their behavior influence their thought processes and emotional reactions during anticipatory and actual interactions with the environment.
The Roles of Knowledge Ascriptions in Epistemic Assessment, MIKKEL GERKEN
It will bring under close analysis the existence in sixteenth-century Iberia of cross-currents common to different religious groups, areas of local religiosity in which different religions overlapped, and vague or hybrid sorts of religiosity which indicate the blurring of clear ascriptions, categories, and borders.
A similar story applies to cases of epistemic good luck in which we do not deserve the sort of epistemic credit necessary for knowledge ascriptions despite having true beliefs.
Topics include the role of questions in epistemological inquiry; how to reconcile the pragmatist and pragmatist-affiliated views of Pierce and Wittgenstein with the traditional definition of knowledge as true belief; knowledge as the epistemic norm of assertion; the acquisition of knowledge by deduction; the implications of the admissible declarative and interrogative complements to prepositional attitude verbs like "know," "believe," and "wonder;" the semantics of the interrogative complements of "know;" critique of the version of intellectualism defended by Jason Stanley and Timothy Williamson; and the implications of the fact that "knowledge how" ascriptions are sometimes read as ability-entailing and sometimes as ability-neutral.
Even more troubling is the fact that Grassby indicates that social ascriptions in heraldic visitations are taken at face value, whereas businessmen described as gentle in wills or depositions were disallowed from the category.
Ascriptions of responsibility for positive acts depend upon similar conditions, namely, the presence of a negative duty not to behave in a specified way and the opportunity to avoid behaving in that way.
Jacob never acknowledges the problems associated with nonauthentic sources: whose hand wrote the various Stamitz manuscripts, who wrote the Stamitz ascriptions on them, and how closely do these manuscripts reflect the composer's intentions?
This seems surprising since, prima facie, evidential support statements seem shifty in a way parallel to knowledge ascriptions.