art


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  • noun

Synonyms for art

Synonyms for art

Synonyms for art

the creation of beautiful or significant things

photographs or other visual representations in a printed publication

References in classic literature ?
So perfect is the Hair Trunk that it moves even persons who ordinarily have no feeling for art.
He is all my art to me now," said the painter gravely.
That which is with you in Spaceland an unmixed evil, blotting out the landscape, depressing the spirits, and enfeebling the health, is by us recognized as a blessing scarcely inferior to air itself, and as the Nurse of arts and Parent of sciences.
Such, then, are the differences of the arts with respect to the medium of imitation.
It is, of course, a ridiculous word to apply to a work of art.
It is made up of accumulated tradition, kept alive by individual pride, rendered exact by professional opinion, and, like the higher arts, it spurred on and sustained by discriminating praise.
It was a hazardous, though maybe a gallant thing to do, since it is probable that the legend commonly received has had no small share in the growth of Strickland's reputation; for there are many who have been attracted to his art by the detestation in which they held his character or the compassion with which they regarded his death; and the son's well-meaning efforts threw a singular chill upon the father's admirers.
Tis thus that the marvellous art of the Middle Ages has been treated in nearly every country, especially in France.
said the Cook, "thou art no better than a thief, I wot.
That shows our Master's contempt for mere Art," said the Second Poet, grinning.
Carlyle viewed pleasure and merely esthetic art with the contempt of the Scottish Covenanting fanatics, refusing even to read poetry like that of Keats; and his insistence on moral meanings led him to equal intolerance of such story-tellers as Scott.
So, now thou art to be at an hour's warning, whensoever
And the interest of any art is the perfection of it--this and nothing else?
Thus the new in art is always formed out of the old.
for it seems perhaps difficult to conceive that any one should have had enough of impudence to lay down dogmatical rules in any art or science without the least foundation.