aristocratic

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Synonyms for aristocratic

Synonyms for aristocratic

Synonyms for aristocratic

belonging to or characteristic of the nobility or aristocracy

References in periodicals archive ?
There is in Swinburne this childlike persistency, this intentness towards an opposite, and this evenly maintained tapping of a sinister, but familiar, source; this, to the onlooker, all-but-heartbreaking pursuit of the remorselessly magical and effortlessly patient replications of an aristocratically perceived nature whose patterns (like the taint of the D'Urbervilles, and Tess's murderous ace of hearts) are finite, and recognized (though never comprehended).
One would have thought that Sostratos, the rich young man who hunts with dogs and has a father with the aristocratically marked name, Kallippides, would be the real "well-born" aristocrat in this play.
Why did Francis Walsingham, backed (one presumes) by the privy council and the queen, instruct Edmond Tilney, 10 March 1583, to cull the best actors from the contemporary aristocratically sponsored companies to form the Queen s Men?
And there are safety factors built in all over the place, under a galvanised skin that is sculpted aristocratically but solidly and firmly.
Her black dress also seemed far too immaculate and her magnificent, silver-topped cane too aristocratically splendid.
Thus for Dissenters opposition to slavery was a way of combating the planters, the oppressive Anglican Establishment, and aristocratically based autocratic rule at home - all of whom supported and were supported by slavery.
Monogamous family life did not exist, but a polygamy whose primal object was the formation of a clan possessing hereditary chiefs ruling aristocratically.
Behind Martin stood Governor Grey, aristocratically jealous of the Crown's pre-emptive powers and implacably hostile to bourgeois land grabbers whether speculators or missionaries.
Although Junger's "guarded enthusiasm" for National Socialism led him in 1927 to contribute another article to its main organ, his peculiarly ethereal brand of nationalism was already distancing him from Hitler's plebian formations: the aristocratically detached author (despite his thoroughly bourgeois origins as the son of a successful pharmacist) declined an offer from the Fuhrer to enter active politics as a Reichstag member representing the N.
Friedman notes that these beliefs took hold in Great Britain more than in the United States because of our less aristocratically oriented social structure.
In both Lower Canada and Ireland, four-fifths of the population were Catholics ruled by aristocratically constituted bodies composed mainly of Protestants.
Professional practice of his sort complements Dupin's compulsion to regain aristocracy, since windfall profits are the closest Dupin can come to simulating inherited wealth, and very occasional work is the closest he can come to being idly and aristocratically rich.
Absolon, in contrast, plays only one part throughout the entire narrative, that of the aristocratically fashionable courtly lover.
In particular, they resist forms of perfectionist moral and political theory, like that of Aristotle,(3) that define the right in terms of some consequentialist aggregate of aristocratically defined excellences that are, in their nature, pursued only by very few (for example, heroes of great courage and military daring, or men of genius) and are distributed very unequally (only a few persons will achieve the Aristotelian excellence of doing philosophy well, or achieving works of genius in the arts or sciences or politics).
Under the "persuasion" of the good-hearted and "sensible," but aristocratically biased Lady Russell, the "one very intimate friend" of her deceased mother, Anne had eight years previously turned down the proposal of a dashing but penniless naval lieutenant, Frederick Wentworth, much against the dictates of her own heart.