apron string


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Related to apron string: Apron shoulder straps
  • noun

Words related to apron string

(usually used in the plural) a cord used to tie an apron at the waist

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
One in five cutting the apron strings for the first time admit they have never cleaned a bath or shower.
On the other, it proves Ocado is further distancing itself from the apron strings of Waitrose, in a clear sign that it believes its main supplier's offer is too premium-centric.
I would however prefer that provincial areas were loosed from the apron strings of central government.
I am convinced that in the 1970s the UK could have prospered without being tied politically and economically to the European apron strings.
So far Tomos is enjoying school: the apron strings are beginning to untie, an issue every mother must inevitably face
He's not tied to his mother's apron strings, he's tied to his sister's.
But by and large, television moms remained tied to their apron strings, even if they were pop singers (Shirley Jones' Shirley Partridge) or employed a faithful maid named Alice to help them with the household chores (Florence Henderson's Carol Brady).
And when it all pays off, and mum or dad bask in their baby's glow of glory, baby herself is forced, out of sheer habit, to hang onto the apron strings even harder.
They grew up in Ohio, next door to their parents' restaurant, and in the restaurant itself, learning the business at their mother's apron strings and their father's feet.
Our land, subjectively mapped, would have more silver cords and apron strings crisscrossing it than railroads and telephone wires.
Photomurals of these two "fathers" appeared beneath the taut, knotted apron strings.
That's because political journalists cracked the whip over last year's dirty tricks when they undid my apron strings - the Shrove Tuesday equivalent of loosening a racehorse's saddle.
This is also the first week that the celebrities have been out on the ice on their own, so it's a case of cutting the apron strings.
The Irish battle axe's creator Brendan O'Caroll had no idea that his character of an infernally interfering mother who refuses to cut her grown-up children's apron strings had become such a big hit outside of Dublin, with the entire country seemingly downing tools to tune into its late afternoon radio slot.