apostrophize


Also found in: Dictionary.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • verb

Synonyms for apostrophize

use an apostrophe

Synonyms

Related Words

References in periodicals archive ?
It is by no means uncommon to apostrophize the dead at a funeral--"X, we will miss you"--and the effect is anything but embarrassing.
She breaks from the dialogue of the octave to apostrophize her own voice:
In short: "the endless prosopopoeia by which the dead are made to have a face and a voice which tells the allegory of their demise, and allows us to apostrophize them in our turn" ("Shelley Disfigured" 68).
1]) and Keats's odes apostrophize the Nightingale, the Grecian Urn, etc.
To apostrophize the goddess of fate is not necessarily to speak in the name of fate, in the name of "that which has been spoken" (fatum).
question, to know, to forget, to erase, to deface, to repeat - that is to say, the endless prosopopoeia by which the dead are made to have a face and a voice which tells the allegory, of their demise and allows us to apostrophize them in our turn.
Quintilian, for example, comments cryptically that the apostrophic gesture "mire movet" ("is wonderfully stirring") (3:396, 397); he hints obscurely that to apostrophize a person (or thing) is more compelling than to state a fact about that person (or thing) (2:42, 43).
It does not address or apostrophize the work of art, aware that no answers will be forthcoming.
He apostrophizes her as his "flower" in a note to Aurora following his first rejected proposal to her and dismissal of her poetic vocation.
Stirred by its remarkable beauty, he apostrophizes a coastal Devonshire town: "Ilfracombe, with your chapels, evangelical churches, chars-a-bancs and variegated terraces, long may you lie embedded in your gorgeous cliffs and hills
6 Clifford apostrophizes Henry VI, Phoebus, York, Richard
51-52, 93-95); his extensive mourning for the Roman Penyus, whom he apostrophizes as "Thou hallowed relique, thou rich diamond / Cut with thine own dust; thou for whose wide fame / The world appears too narrow" (5.
Early in To the Wonder, Marina (Olga Kurylenko), a Frenchwoman transposed from Paris to Oklahoman exurbia, beckons her (unnamed) boyfriend, a bemused Ben Affleck, by ceaselessly whirling and gamboling ahead of him through city streets and fields of grass, and apostrophizes a lonely cumulus: "What is this love that loves us?
11) In a similar vein, Sir Philip Sidney in sonnet 39 of Astrophel and Stella (1591) apostrophizes sleep as "The poor man's wealth, the prisoner's release, / Th' indifferent judge between the high and low.
The very first line apostrophizes the physician, paradoxically calling him "God's true soldier" and asking him to join other "fall'n children of renown.