aphasic


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Related to aphasic: aphasia, apraxia, dysphasia
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  • noun
  • adj

Words related to aphasic

someone affected by aphasia or inability to use or understand language

Related Words

unable to speak because of a brain lesion

References in periodicals archive ?
Towards theory-driven therapies for aphasic verb impairments: A review of current theory and practice.
it is nature's sadness or mourning that renders it mute and aphasic, that leaves it without words (Die Traurigkeit der Natur macht sie verstummen).
Efficacy and generalization of treatment for aphasic naming errors.
While speech therapy works well at improving speech following aphasic stroke, it can be frustratingly slow.
Verbal response is not included in the scoring since aphasic and intubated patients cannot be evaluated, as was denoted and discussed in earlier studies (5,17).
Following ua neeb kho (healing ceremony), the aphasic shaman took corrective action by properly maintaining his altar.
Bettencourt "suffers from cognitive difficulties evidenced by temporal disorientation, memory problems, reasoning difficulties and aphasic elements," Le Monde quoted the report as saying.
Still, readers will cheer West's first aphasic efforts to write again, their clumsy originality, their humor and clear pain.
Recent articles by Jarmila Mildorf ("Thought Presentation and Constructed Dialogue in Oral Stories: Limits and Possibilities of a Cross-Disciplinary Narratology") and Tarja Aaltonen ("'Mind-reading,' A Method for Understanding the Broken Narrative of an Aphasic Man") have confirmed my optimism.
In studying aphasia, it seemed to some of my colleagues and I that the condition was contagious: prolonged contact with aphasic patients and the literature of aphasia leads to nobody being able to understand you.
Several hours later, a nurse reported that Elena was aphasic, or unable to speak.
Because the patient was aphasic, confused, and drowsy, tacrolimus was replaced by low-dose sirolimus.
Gestures that can be readily interpreted by others are often advocated in aphasia treatment, but can be difficult for aphasic people to learn, because they have additional stroke-related disabilities, such as one-sided paralysis.