estrogen

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  • noun

Synonyms for estrogen

a general term for female steroid sex hormones that are secreted by the ovary and responsible for typical female sexual characteristics

References in periodicals archive ?
We previously reported the identification of the breast cancer anti-estrogen resistance 1 gene (BCAR1) [4] whose overexpression confers resistance against antiestrogen drugs to an estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line (1).
We have identified BCAR1/p130Cas in a functional screen for proliferation of human breast cancer cells resistant to an antiestrogen drug and provided evidence that high concentrations of BCAR1 protein in primary breast tumors are associated with poor prognosis (2,14).
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved FASLODEX in 2002 for the treatment of hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer in postmenopausal women with disease progression following antiestrogen therapy, such as tamoxifen.
Two nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitors, anastrozole and letrozole, are approved in the United States as first- or second-line treatment of hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, and one steroidal aromatase inactivator, exemestane, is approved for hormone therapy for women with metastatic breast cancer after disease progression or after antiestrogen therapy.
1995) so they may exert estrogen and antiestrogen effects in organisms.
Results with Herceptin are of interest because they provide a new therapeutic option for some patients in whom antiestrogen therapy (tamoxifen and raloxifen) is not effective (8,28).
TABLE 35 GLOBAL SALES OF ANTIESTROGEN AND SELECTIVE ESTROGEN RECPTOR MODULATORS, THROUGH 2013 ($MILLIONS)
2] as a "positive" control, with its nonmonotonic and nonhormetic dose-response curve in comparison with BPA (which has a presumably monotonic response curve), as well as the use of an antiestrogen (tamoxifen), is inappropriate.
In addition, it is indicated for first-line treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive or hormone receptor-unknown locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer and for the treatment of advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal women with disease progression following antiestrogen therapy.
Numerous studies have shown that the antiestrogen agent tamoxifen not only induces remission in advanced breast cancer but also prolongs relapse-free as well as overall survival rates when administered to breast cancer patients in the adjuvant setting (3).
In this study, patients with hormone receptor expressing advanced breast therapy whose disease had progressed on an antiestrogen therapy are being randomized to treatment with either IMC-A12 as a single agent or IMC-A12 in combination with same dose and schedule of the last antiestrogen therapy to which their disease became refractory.
Tamoxifen was not disqualified as an antiestrogen because it elicited a binding higher than that of BPA.
Femara, a leading, once-a-day oral aromatase inhibitor, is also indicated for first-line treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor- positive or hormone receptor-unknown locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer and for the treatment of advanced breast cancer in postmenopausal women with disease progression following antiestrogen therapy.
This observation is cause for concern in that giving tamoxifen may select for populations of breast cells that are antiestrogen resistant.